Reviews > Books

1 Mar 2007 // 8:58 PM

The Conjurer by Cordelia Frances Biddle

The Conjurer mystery opens underbelly of Philadelphia society, 1842.

READ more
They Call Me Naughty Lola by David Rose [Editor]

Why on earth did someone in the first column ask for a "contortionist who plays the trumpet"? Apart from the obvious?

READ more

28 Feb 2007 // 8:59 PM

So Sad to Fall in Battle by Kumiko Kakehashi

Japan's most brilliant general was a 'pro-American' maverick.

READ more

27 Feb 2007 // 9:00 PM

Transparent by Cris Beam

Christina combines intense vulnerability with a survivor's furious poise; on any given day, she can swing from gushing about Geri Halliwell to carving up her arm with a kitchen knife, but throughout it all we sense in her a miraculous core of resilience and insight.

READ more
The Perfect Thing by Steven Levy

Levy does not propose that we consider the iPod to be a perfect or ideal thing; rather, he begins from the premise that the cultural marketplace has already rendered this verdict.

READ more
One Must Also Be Hungarian by Adam Biro, translated by Catherine Tihanyi

The author recognizes that his characters are as much a reflection of himself as they are individuals in their own right.

READ more
On the Wealth of Nations: Books That Changed the World by P. J. ORourke

Humorist P.J. O'Rourke livens things up in a new book on economic pioneer Adam Smith.

READ more
The Story of the Cannibal Woman by Maryse Conde (translated from the French by Richard Philcox)

Carribean novelist Maryse Conde's ambitious mystery is filled with delicious irony and remarkable narrative verve.

READ more

22 Feb 2007 // 9:02 PM

The Art of Losing by Keith Dixon

A deceptive The Art of Losing morphs from caper to moral fable.

READ more

22 Feb 2007 // 9:01 PM

The Kouga Ninja Scrolls by Futaro Yamada

Secret warfare, mystical powers, political turmoil and two ancient, feuding ninja families: it's no wonder that Futaro Yamada's classic Japanese novel still endures.

READ more

22 Feb 2007 // 9:00 PM

Charles Addams: A Cartoonists Life by Linda H. Davis

Charles Addams' cartoons are fascinating, but not his life.

READ more
The Call of the Weird by Louis Theroux

Lamb and Lynx showed signs of wanting to go mainstream, and describe Green Day as the equivalent of "pretty good for a commie band".

READ more

21 Feb 2007 // 8:59 PM

Somewhere: A Life of Jerome Robbins by Amanda Vaill

A compelling biography of innovative dance master Jerome Robbins.

READ more
Nemesis by Chalmers Johnson

Ultimately, Johnson lays out a troubling barrage of facts to buttress his case, but it's an avalanche as opposed to a finely articulated trickle.

READ more

20 Feb 2007 // 8:59 PM

A Bee in the Mouth: Anger in America Now by Peter Wood

"New Anger" traced to those '60s liberals in A Bee in the Mouth.

READ more
Profane Waste by Gretchen Craft Rubin and Dana Hoey

What is the point of a self-indulgent celebration of waste, profane or otherwise, in this age of inconvenient truth, a time in which ecological sustainability is the single-most pressing issue facing the planet?

READ more
The Rhythm of the Road by Albyn Leah Hall

The tragedy of music, on the evidence of The Rhythm of the Road is the way it lends flesh to powerful escapist fantasies, which for some people prove more appealing than the real world.

READ more

18 Feb 2007 // 9:00 PM

What Paul Meant by Garry Wills

Garry Wills' new book is a bold appraisal of the apostle.

READ more
Steal This Music by Joanna Demers

Music has presented copyright challenges nearly from the start, according to Demers, in part because the law has generally lagged behind technology.

READ more

15 Feb 2007 // 9:00 PM

Bad Blood by Linda Fairstein

Going underground in New York.

READ more
More Recent Reviews
//Mixed media
//Blogs

A Chat with José González at Newport Folk Festival

// Notes from the Road

"José González's sets during Newport Folk Festival weren't on his birthday (that is today) but each looked to be a special intimate performance.

READ the article