Reviews > Books
Democracy’s Prisoner by Ernest Freeberg

Freeberg demonstrates, at times chillingly, how a nation caught in the grip of a war, popular or otherwise, can demonstrate shockingly little regard for individual liberties.

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Rock ‘n’ Roll Babylon: 50 Years of Sex, Drugs and Rock ‘n’ Roll

Whether it's an about-face, religious conversion denouncing former indulgences or a sincere effort to remain faithful or get clean, there are a lot of rockers quick to blame all of their sins on rock 'n' roll.

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21 Aug 2008 // 10:59 PM

The Lemur by Benjamin Black

Enough red herrings strewn in your path to keep you guessing almost to the end

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The Dark Side by Jane Mayer

As Mayer recounts in her history of what followed 9/11, Cheney was ready for this scenario because he'd been "secretly practicing for doomsday."

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19 Aug 2008 // 11:00 PM

Sex and the Soul by Donna Freitas

Even if values systems and community-based approaches at evangelical campuses are admirable, will they allow students some breathing room when it comes to sexual propriety?

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Touch Me, I’m Sick by Tom Reynolds

Ever the philanthrope, Reynolds hunts through the archives of music history to find 52 of the most chillingly unhinged love songs.

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The Black Death by John Hatcher

From this great tragedy emerges a fascinating power struggle, one that contemporary readers may see as the first stirrings of the modern ideas of liberty and social justice.

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17 Aug 2008 // 10:59 PM

Flower Confidential by Amy Stewart

Revealing the complex processes that make a wide variety of flowers available in markets across the world, what's found often isn't so beautiful.

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Man in the Dark by Paul Auster

This superb small novel isn’t about war or politics at all, but about, in the face of guilt and horror, choosing whether to die and how, if that is the choice, to live.

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Weird Indiana: by Mark Marimen

These stories leave the reader in a stupor, much like that induced by a long drive on the interstate through mile after mile of Indiana cornfields, as far as the eye can see.

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The Revolution Continues: New Art From China, by The Saatchi Gallery

This is the glorious trick of the book: getting readers to watch meaning generate and evolve, all between one cover and the next.

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Doris Day: The Untold Story of the Girl Next Door, by David Kaufman

Kaufman, a theater critic and author, worked on Day's bio for eight years and tracked down sources who knew her from childhood as well as recent acquaintances.

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12 Aug 2008 // 11:00 PM

The Amnesiac by Sam Taylor

An intricately plotted, existential thriller like a house of cards -- one in which readers would be more than happy to linger.

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The United Symbolism of America by Robert Hieronimus and Laura Cortner

The symbols aren’t sinister -- we’ve just forgotten how to read them. These days, if something isn’t clear in a literal sense, it is inherently suspicious.

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11 Aug 2008 // 10:59 PM

The James Boys by Richard Liebmann-Smith

What if outlaw Jesse James and author Henry James were brothers?

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Ten Bad Dates with De Niro, by Richard T. Kelly

A serious (and quite often satiric) cinematic shopping list for moviegoers.

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10 Aug 2008 // 11:00 PM

Devil’s Cape

The burgeoning sub-genre of the superhero novel now has its best entry, and one that will set the standard for years to come.

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The Sleeping Giant Has Awoken eds. Jeffrey W. Robbins and Neal Magee

Religion, like politics, is often in the hands of the translator, and when that translation is in the interest of the person instead of the prophecy, something is amiss.

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7 Aug 2008 // 10:59 PM

Dear American Airlines

Written in the form of a consumer complaint letter, it doesn’t take long for the deficiencies of the airline to give way as an elegy emerges to a life slid asunder.

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Ska’d For Life: A Personal Journey With The Specials by Horance Panter

Horace Panter, bassist for second wave ska pioneers, The Specials, tells his tale with equal parts wit and class.

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NYFF 2017: 'Mudbound'

// Notes from the Road

"Dee Rees’ churning and melodramatic epic follows two families in 1940s Mississippi, one black and one white, and the wars they fight abroad and at home.

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