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Tuesday, June 29 2004

So You Wanna Be a Rock & Roll Star: How I Machine-Gunned a Roomful of Record Executives and Other Tr

Slichter seems to have cleverly rewritten his material in the apparent hope that it can be used as a textbook by burgeoning young stars to slip past the Simon Cowells of the music world.


Peace Kills: America’s Fun New Imperialism by P.J. O’Rourke

O'Rourke does more than simply visit these places, he goes out of his way to finding understanding in them, to find common ground. It's a commitment few understand and are willing to indulge in.


Natasha: And Other Stories by David Bezmozgis

Bezmozgis is undeniably a promising young writer, but now, only 147 pages into his career, he could not be called the new Roth, the new Malamud, or even the new Jhumpa Lahiri.


Tuesday, June 22 2004

So Long Been Dreaming: Postcolonial Science Fiction and Fantasy by Nalo Hopkinson and Uppinder Mehan

We cannot reverse the effects of colonization: exploration alters not only the colonized, 'discovered' people but the explorer.


The Hollywood Dodo by Geoff Nicholson

The Hollywood Dodo itself is a film script, a mechanical reproduction of the extinct bird, a few corpses, fragments of a novel -- in fact a multitude of interlinked things.


Going East by Matthew d’Ancona

Even if Mia acts and dresses like she is working class, she will never be working class. In the end, Mia hasn't changed; her evolution is superficial.


The Bad Guys Won by Jeff Pearlman

If the bad guys won, then maybe the good guys lost, and that's certainly true in Bill Buckner's case.


Tuesday, June 15 2004

Severed: The True Story of the Black Dahlia by John Gilmore

Elizabeth Short exists now as an image, the victim of what Gilmore calls 'crime as a spectacular act'.


Grab Bag / The Haunted Hillbilly by Derek McCormack

No wonder there's a skeleton on the front cover. The story is entirely bare bones.


Fashion Under Fascism: Beyond the Black Shirt by Eugenia Paulicelli

The Fascists took up the fashion industry cause as part of their agenda of managing cultural expressions of nation, class and gender in the construction of a New Italy.


Tuesday, June 8 2004

The Schooling of Claybird Catts by Janis Owens

Coming of age plots haven't gone out of style -- the term has. There's got to be a better phrase: Grow up or shut up. Reality excursions. Maturity madness.


Stranger Than Fiction: True Stories by Chuck Palahniuk

Once you've looked at people on a close enough level, you can't pretend to believe in normality any longer.


Sunday, June 6 2004

The Secret Life of Lobsters: How Fishermen and Scientists Are Unraveling the Mysteries of Our Favori

Yuppie feeding frenzies have driven other species to the brink of extinction. Might that be the lobster's fate?"


Image Ethics in the Digital Age by Larry Gross, John Stuart Katz, and Jay Ruby

The deep control that software gives us over images also softens our trust that they represent something genuine.


Wednesday, June 2 2004

The Urban Picnic by John Burns and Elisabeth Caton

The picnic is an everyday possibility, a refuge from the demands of the working world that can be accessed in the city as well as the countryside.


Radio Activity by Bill Fitzhugh

While decrying the pop culture mass-produced state of the music industry, Fitzhugh veers dangerously close to contributing to the mass-produced made-for-the-movies state of the publishing industry.


I, Shithead: A Life in Punk by Joey Keithley

When Ted Koppel and the Dixie Chicks are arguably more 'punk' than most politically lazy Generation-Y rock bands, you know something's amiss.


Between Two Rivers by Nicholas Rinaldi

After re-experiencing the World Trade Center attacks, there can't fail to be a sense of history in the making, for Rinaldi manages to convey the peculiar fascination of September 11th and its lasting effect on the American consciousness.


Wednesday, May 26 2004

Way Past Legal by Norman Green

What elevates this book far beyond other page-turners is Green's acute understanding of the emotional bonds between people: father and son, husband and wife, boss and subordinate.


The Last Ride by Denise Young

The author has wants only to champion the self-awareness of some of them rather than challenge their idea that a bad upbringing is a license to be an asshole.


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