Reviews > Books

11 May 2008 // 10:59 PM

Sepulchre by Kate Mosse

Much entertaining nonsense, not a bit of it plausible, takes place in each narrative stream.

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Dizzying Heights by Bruce Ducker

Ducker turns away from some of the more sorrowful themes of his past to have a little fun at money's expense, and in doing so highlights some of the contradictions of Colorado with a sense of charm and wit.

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8 May 2008 // 10:59 PM

The Complex by Nick Turse

This could've been written while sitting at one desk and never even seeing the inside of the Pentagon, or any military establishment, or speaking to a single person with any knowledge on the subject.

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Unaccustomed Earth by Jhumpa Lahiri

Lahiri often confuses size with scope, hoping that by making her stories long they will achieve some sort of literary heft.

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7 May 2008 // 10:59 PM

Madness by Marya Hornbacher

The problem here may be that Hornbacher doesn't remember much of her own life, which would make writing a memoir difficult.

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All Music Guide Required Listening: Classic Rock / Old School Rap and Hip-Hop / Contemporary Country

Overall, this is just what you’d expect from the creators of the AMG online database: exhaustive in its approach and attempts to give readers an understanding of the bigger picture.

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6 May 2008 // 10:59 PM

Relish by Ruth Cowen

Relish will appeal to Victorian history buffs, dedicated foodies, and those who love compelling biographies of the once-famous, now-obscure.

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The Man Who Turned Into Himself by David Ambrose

Ambrose hypnotizes readers with his sheer, unflinching ability to capture the confusion, betrayal, and regret that must be present in every possible world.

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5 May 2008 // 10:59 PM

The Forger by Cioma Schonhaus

It is his efforts in saving others which lend the book its title, and earned Schonhaus his nickname as the “Jewish Schindler”.

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The Sorrows of an American by Siri Hustvedt

Hustvedt's ability to incorporate so much material so seamlessly makes reading this book like drinking a wonderful old burgundy: rich, complex, lush, smooth.

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A Dangerous Age by Ellen Gilchrist

Evidently Gilchrist missed the sickening exposés of conditions at Walter Reed, or chose to overlook them.

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Coal Black Horse by Robert Olmstead

Spare, poetic lines render ghostly a world where death is too commonplace to haunt, but too pervasive to ignore -- the story of a boy learning a man's lessons.

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In Township Tonight! by David B. Coplan

Coplan's work here sometimes sags under the soggy weight of too much praise, but the whole thing is so good that the distraction is forgivable

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The World That Made New Orleans by Ned Sublette

Sublette, who thinks like a historian and writes like a pop critic, relates the origins of New Orleans unlike any other on the globe as a convoluted, carefully detailed yarn that’s even more entertaining because it’s true.

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30 Apr 2008 // 10:59 PM

The Race Card by Richard Thompson Ford

The Race Card brilliantly forces thinking on practices such as profiling to new levels of candor and complexity.

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29 Apr 2008 // 11:00 PM

Blood Kin by Ceridwen Dovey

Throughout this portrait of a small republic following a coup, Dovey seems to question whether it’s those who seek power who are already corrupted.

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29 Apr 2008 // 10:59 PM

Girls Like Us by Sheila Weller

Trailblazing women of the '60s: Journalist Sheila Weller traces three enduring songwriters who defined -- and gave voice to -- a generation.

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Born Yesterday by Gordon Burn

The obsessive persistence of connections and the hidden bonds that link places through time recalls the psychogeography of Iain Sinclair, and this novel is richer for them.

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27 Apr 2008 // 11:00 PM

You Call This the Future? by Nick Sagan, Mark Frary, Andy Walker

The authors seize on our lingering disappointment in the past's prediction of the gadgets we'd have in the future (that is, now) with this user-friendly book; a 'where are they now?' revisiting of future myths.

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27 Apr 2008 // 10:59 PM

Frontman by Richard Barone

As a “how to” book, Barone goes about much of his business with tongue in cheek, but his “lessons” are useful enough to earn it a place on musicians’ bookshelves right next to Songwriting for Dummies or Making Money with Your Studio.

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