Reviews > Books

13 Oct 2006 // 12:00 AM

Autobiography of My Hand by Kurt S. Olsson

The first poem in Bright Hill Press’ 2005 Poetry Chapbook winner, “Grace”, begins: They are here to teach him about power, a gang of ten-year-olds. Hands

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13 Oct 2006 // 12:00 AM

A Unified Theory of Light by Theodore Worozbyt

Dream Horse Press makes some ugly editorial mistakes with their 2005 National Poetry Chapbook Prize Winner, Theodore Worozbyt. In the table of contents, “Corn” is listed

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13 Oct 2006 // 12:00 AM

The Birds Are on Fire by Kay Sloan

Every year, Finishing Line books publishes 30 chapbooks by unknown poets. I’ve read four now, and all are tastefully designed with lovely cover art and

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11 Oct 2006 // 12:00 AM

Color of the Sea by John Hamamura

Hamamura's background bestows him with tremendous understanding of both Japanese and American psyches.

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10 Oct 2006 // 12:00 AM

Binge by Barrett Seaman

As "one male Ivy League junior" affirmed, "It's easier to go out and get fucked up and hook up than be sober and ask a girl on a date and get nothing for it".

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Divas and Scholars by Philip Gossett

This book attempts to come to grips with the sometimes rather fraught intersection between the scholarly ideal and the practical exigencies of the stage.

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6 Oct 2006 // 12:00 AM

Someday Well All Be Free by Kevin Powell

In this regard, unlike many in the hip-hop community, Powell resists a parochial black nationalism and a truncated heterosexism. The "all" in the title of this book means ALL.

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5 Oct 2006 // 12:00 AM

Homicide by David Simon

When these detectives trade gallows humor over a stone whodunit (department terminology for a case likely never to be solved), it seems less like entertainment and more about keeping despair at bay.

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Falling Room by Eli Hastings

Hastings has written a much more interesting memoir than his self-described "angst-ridden, infantile leftist lens" might lead one to expect.

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The Illustrated Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte, illustrations by Dame Darcy

Darcy could not have better portrayed this moment of recognition, the moment when Jane fully grasps, for the first time, the concept of sin and all it entails.

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2 Oct 2006 // 12:00 AM

Cursed From Birth by David Ohle

He fills an entire page with the single word "pain," adding at the very end, "and in hospitals you learn to, Hate, Hate ..."

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My Freshman Year by Rebekah Nathan

It's a shame that this book is so disappointing, because Nathan/Small is right about its need.

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28 Sep 2006 // 1:00 AM

Persian Fire by Tom Holland

Holland manages to synthesize the scope and emotion of his classical sources without sacrificing an iota of historical stringency.

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A Short History of Tractors in Ukrainian by Marina Lewycka

[It is] about using the roots of one family's persistent psychodrama to view the greater crisis of war, power, and national/cultural upheaval.

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26 Sep 2006 // 2:00 AM

Small Acts of Sex and Electricity by Lise Haines

Try as she might, Haines can't write about sex in either an arousing or thought-provoking way, and Small Acts feels stagnant, rather than electric.

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Housekeeping vs. The Dirt by Nick Hornby

Hornby seems unable to decide if this is a serious book about reading, or a light-hearted diary for his friends and fans, to be taken with a pinch of salt.

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22 Sep 2006 // 12:00 AM

My Fathers War by Paul West

For writer Paul West, the connections between the two world wars of the last century transcend the likes of a train car at Compiegne and

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21 Sep 2006 // 11:59 PM

TV a-Go-Go by Jake Austen

According to author Jake Austen, televised rock music is in some ways an impossible combination ... and one that he absolutely adores. Rock music is essentially “

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21 Sep 2006 // 11:58 PM

Singing Cowboys and Musical Mountaineers by Bill C. Malone

When it comes to tracing the roots of American music, there’s just no place like the South: jazz, rhythm & blues, rock ‘n’ roll,

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21 Sep 2006 // 11:57 PM

Clever Maids by Valerie Paradiz

Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm were prolific German scholars, yet the work they are best known for, the one that will eternally bear their name was

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