Reviews > Books
The Sorrows of an American by Siri Hustvedt

Hustvedt's ability to incorporate so much material so seamlessly makes reading this book like drinking a wonderful old burgundy: rich, complex, lush, smooth.

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A Dangerous Age by Ellen Gilchrist

Evidently Gilchrist missed the sickening exposés of conditions at Walter Reed, or chose to overlook them.

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Coal Black Horse by Robert Olmstead

Spare, poetic lines render ghostly a world where death is too commonplace to haunt, but too pervasive to ignore -- the story of a boy learning a man's lessons.

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In Township Tonight! by David B. Coplan

Coplan's work here sometimes sags under the soggy weight of too much praise, but the whole thing is so good that the distraction is forgivable

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The World That Made New Orleans by Ned Sublette

Sublette, who thinks like a historian and writes like a pop critic, relates the origins of New Orleans unlike any other on the globe as a convoluted, carefully detailed yarn that’s even more entertaining because it’s true.

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30 Apr 2008 // 10:59 PM

The Race Card by Richard Thompson Ford

The Race Card brilliantly forces thinking on practices such as profiling to new levels of candor and complexity.

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29 Apr 2008 // 11:00 PM

Blood Kin by Ceridwen Dovey

Throughout this portrait of a small republic following a coup, Dovey seems to question whether it’s those who seek power who are already corrupted.

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29 Apr 2008 // 10:59 PM

Girls Like Us by Sheila Weller

Trailblazing women of the '60s: Journalist Sheila Weller traces three enduring songwriters who defined -- and gave voice to -- a generation.

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Born Yesterday by Gordon Burn

The obsessive persistence of connections and the hidden bonds that link places through time recalls the psychogeography of Iain Sinclair, and this novel is richer for them.

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27 Apr 2008 // 11:00 PM

You Call This the Future? by Nick Sagan, Mark Frary, Andy Walker

The authors seize on our lingering disappointment in the past's prediction of the gadgets we'd have in the future (that is, now) with this user-friendly book; a 'where are they now?' revisiting of future myths.

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27 Apr 2008 // 10:59 PM

Frontman by Richard Barone

As a “how to” book, Barone goes about much of his business with tongue in cheek, but his “lessons” are useful enough to earn it a place on musicians’ bookshelves right next to Songwriting for Dummies or Making Money with Your Studio.

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Corporate Warriors by P. W. Singer

By refusing to cast himself as a finger-wagging scold on the subject of military contractors, Singer’s concerns have all that much more power.

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Our Story Begins by Tobias Wolff

Wolff's keen eye for the right phrase, the perfect detail, his ability to represent these characters in all their flawed honesty, make these stories brilliantly his own.

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Beautiful Children by Charles Bock

Bock's characters bob, weave and occasionally collide as they jackknife inexorably onwards towards an anti-climactic conclusion.

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22 Apr 2008 // 10:59 PM

Willie Nelson: An Epic Life by Joe Nick Patoski

New Willie Nelson biography light on revelations, but fans will relish intimate details.

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The Moments Lost by Bruce Olds

At times impressive in scope and range, the narrative ultimately suffers and strangulates under the weight of the author’s use and abuse of alliterations and arcane verbs and nouns.

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20 Apr 2008 // 11:00 PM

Rightward Bound by Bruce J. Schulman, Julian E. Zelizer (Editors)

Jacobs writes that the [1973-74 energy] crisis ultimately taught “conservative reformers a valuable lesson: fighting liberalism is hard”.

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20 Apr 2008 // 10:59 PM

Swimming in a Sea of Death by David Rieff

The subject of Rieff's book is not just Susan Sontag's death. It is also the ways in which our willingness, or refusal, to acknowledge impending death affects our relationships with the people around us.

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17 Apr 2008 // 11:00 PM

Black Space by Adilifu Nama

A thought-provoking and timely exploration of white racial anxieties as projected onto black males in science fiction films.

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Wolves of the Crescent Moon by Yousef Al-Mohaimeed

This intense, fanciful story provides a uniquely slanted window into the manners and culture of Saudi Arabia. Small wonder it was banned in the Kingdom.

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Gremlins and the Housewife in 'Don't Be Afraid of the Dark'

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