Reviews > Books

19 Nov 2006 // 4:00 PM

Golem Song by Marc Estrin

Alan Krieger, self-styled arbiter of Jewish identity, is a charming monster -- omnivorous reader with apparently perfect recall, consumer of White Castle burgers and Reddi-Wip, racist, paranoiac, and, at least in desire, a mass-murderer.

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17 Nov 2006 // 12:00 AM

Nature Girl by Carl Hiaasen

In his 11th novel Carl Hiaasen doesn't focus on his favorite subject -- the spoiling of Florida. He turns it personal in a tale about how we treat each other.

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16 Nov 2006 // 4:00 PM

I Shouldnt Even Be Doing This! by Bob Newhart

Phoebe Kate Foster tributes a comic genius.

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13 Ways of Looking at the Novel by Jane Smiley

You might argue with her judgments, as I did with her criticism of Conrad's Heart of Darkness, but you can't help but sense that hers is the more grounded point of view.

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14 Nov 2006 // 4:00 PM

Justice for All: Earl Warren and the Nation He Made by Jim Newton

In the years after he named Earl Warren as chief justice, President Dwight Eisenhower made clear he regretted the choice, calling it one of his biggest mistakes.

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Does It Matter? by Graham Dunstan Martin

[Martin] is as much at odds with Professors Dawkins and Dennet as was Stephen Jay Gould.

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apostrophe by Bill Kennedy and Darren Wershler-Henry

As instantiated online, the apostrophe engine turns your attention away from the poem on the screen, and to the hyperlink that beckons you to click again.

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12 Nov 2006 // 4:00 PM

Shutting Out the Sun by Michael Zielenziger

Author Michael Zielenzeger toiled as a newspaper reporter in Japan for almost a decade, bearing witness to the soulless materialism and closed-mindedness that's helped run that once-proud nation asunder.

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9 Nov 2006 // 4:00 PM

Anonymous Lawyer by Jeremy Blachman

The laughs come from Blachman's Seinfeld-like eye for detail and [Woody] Allen-like fondness for the absurd.

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8 Nov 2006 // 4:00 PM

Nightwood by Djuna Barnes

'Have you ever loved someone and it became yourself?' It is a question that nearly all the characters of Nightwood can answer in the affirmative.

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Catch a Wave by Peter Ames Carlin

At this point in music mythology, any author foolish enough to take on the saga of Brian Wilson and those damned dysfunctional Beach Boys is asking for a world of literary hurt.

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Dangerous Nation by Robert Kagan

Kagan is a realist who understands idealism; a rare combination among historical writers, and part of what helps make Dangerous Nation such a gratifying and illuminating read.

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Rain Village by Carolyn Turgeon

I felt as though I, like Tessa, was flying through the air without a safety net.

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2 Nov 2006 // 9:00 PM

The End by Lemony Snicket

Because their desperately perilous circumstances force them to behave in ways they would have never previously imagined, the children begin to wonder if they are losing their moral compass.

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2 Nov 2006 // 9:00 PM

Wolf Boy by Evan Kuhlman

Wolf Boy portrays children on the threshold of that crossing over into the far less interesting concerns of adolescence, capturing the last golden summer of weird, perfect youth. The circumstances into which he places his characters, however, are neither perfect nor golden.

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1 Nov 2006 // 9:00 PM

Everything That Rises Must Converge

It's become increasingly difficult, if not impossible, to find an appliance that merely serves its original function -- a phone that is just a phone, for example.

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The End of Mr. Y by Scarlett Thomas

Where are all the female cult writers?

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State of Denial by Bob Woodward

Why delve into a piece of nonfiction that simply fleshes out a number of points already well hashed-over in that mainstream liberal media so loathed by the right? (Note to vast liberal conspiracy: Job well done!) The reason is simple: you may think you know, but you don't.

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27 Oct 2006 // 12:10 AM

Conservatize Me by John Moe

The idea behind John Moe’s Conservatize Me sounds too much like something Morgan Spurlock would come up with on an off-night for his 30 Days

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Games and Sport in Everyday Life by Robert Perinbanayagam

If there’s a sociological study that would seem to have broad appeal, it’s one that looks at games and sport. Hunter College professor

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Indie Horror Month 2015: 'Dark Echo'

// Moving Pixels

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