Reviews > Books
Mission Accomplished by Khalil Bendib

Political cartooning in America is in terrible trouble.

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30 Aug 2007 // 10:41 PM

Confessions of a Jane Austen Addict by Laurie Viera Rigler

Two new books explore Jane Austin's world through time-traveling fiction and whimsical self-help.

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The Jamestown Project by Karen Ordahl Kupperman

For as long as it's been a part of history, the colony at Jamestown has been a bit of an older, ugly stepsister compared to the Pilgrims at Plymouth.

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29 Aug 2007 // 10:41 PM

Daddys Girls by Tasmina Perry

Glossy, first-class Daddy's Girls focuses heavily on the careers, loves, losses of the siblings, with a touch of secrets.

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28 Aug 2007 // 11:00 PM

Becoming Shakespeare by Jack Lynch

Jack Lynch, a professor of English at Rutgers University, provides an informative account of the afterlife of the provincial playwright who became "the greatest portraitist of the human condition."

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The Evolving Brain by R. Grant Steen

Steen is refreshingly up-to-date on all the latest debates and controversies in brain studies.

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28 Aug 2007 // 2:00 AM

Last One In by Nicholas Kulish

There hasn't exactly been a glut of fiction dealing with the current war in Iraq.

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27 Aug 2007 // 10:59 PM

Keeping the House by Ellen Baker

Two wives, a generation apart, intertwine in Keeping the House.

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The Assault on Reason by Al Gore

The author appears to be at the brink, a rational man who has, like so many of us, been pulling his hair out for several years now in impotent rage over the avalanche of nonsense issuing from positions of power in this country.

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26 Aug 2007 // 10:59 PM

The Alchemyst by Michael Scott

Two teens and a 600-year-old wizard battle evil in modern California in The Alchemyst.

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23 Aug 2007 // 11:00 PM

The Company by Robert Littell

The Company fails the Cheez-It test on several levels.

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23 Aug 2007 // 10:59 PM

When the World Was Young by Tony Romano

The first novel by Romano is a multilayered, often dark and edgy saga of one Italian-American family in the mid-to-later decades of 20th-century Chicago.

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The Moncada Attack: Birth of the Cuban Revolution by Antonio Rafael de la Cova

While de la Cova's book is the most definitive work to date on the events of July 26, 1953, and one that any Cubanologist would find of interest, its mind-numbing detail makes for tedious reading.

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Dont Panic by Cassandra Wilkinson

Wilkinson gives an interesting and challenging look at what's good about capitalism.

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22 Aug 2007 // 10:59 PM

Out Stealing Horses by Per Petterson

Norwegian's Out Stealing Horses merits its fat prize.

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22 Aug 2007 // 10:58 PM

Good As Lily by Derek Kirk Kim

Inventive graphic novel for girls explores fear of the future.

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Hitchcock and Philosophy by David Baggett and William A. Drumin [Editors]

To borrow a phrase from a filmmaker friend of mine, these books are ontic antics with a vengeance.

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21 Aug 2007 // 10:59 PM

The Always Unexpected in ‘The Black Swan’

The principal theme of Nicholas Taleb's book is this: how important what we do not know is to a proper understanding of things.

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21 Aug 2007 // 10:58 PM

Thursday Next: First Among Sequels by Jasper Fforde

Fforde welcomes the reader into the crazed, madcap world that is Thursday's, and suddenly it becomes easy, even irresistible, to accept time-travel paradoxes and jumps into and out of fiction.

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Salmonella Men on Planet Porno by Yasutaka Tsutsui

There's a mean streak of misogyny that runs almost throughout the collection and tends to distract from everything else going on around it.

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