Reviews > Books

20 Aug 2007 // 10:59 PM

The World Without Us by Alan Weisman

The World Without Us gradually reveals itself to be one of the most satisfying environmental books of recent memory, one devoid of self-righteousness, alarmism or tiresome doomsaying.

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20 Aug 2007 // 10:58 PM

Spook Country by William Gibson

Spook Country follows complex path of post-9/11 mentality.

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19 Aug 2007 // 11:00 PM

After Dark by Haruki Murakami

Allusions are drawn, but the details are murky enough to keep us guessing.

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The New Time Travelers: A Journey to the Frontiers of Physics by David Toomey

Futureward time travel isn't just possible, it's real, what Toomey calls "an inevitable consequence of Einstein's theory of special relativity."

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16 Aug 2007 // 11:00 PM

Chasing Cool by Noah Kerner and Gene Pressman

Becoming the "iPod of your industry" requires more than mimicking a "cool" brand.

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Sin in the Second City: Madams, Ministers, Playboys, and the Battle for Americas Soul by Karen Abbot

It's a spare-no-detail, almost rollicking read about the Everleigh Club, an ultra-opulent brothel run by two sisters as the crown jewel of early-20th-century Chicago's vice kingdom, the notorious Levee district.

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Instructions for American Servicemen in Iraq during World War II by The United States Army

Time after time Nagl points to nuggets of advice in the 60-plus-year-old booklet and affirms that they are absolutely still applicable today.

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Japan Rising: The Resurgence of Japanese Power and Purpose by Kenneth B. Pyle

The book is a penetrating survey of Japan from the 1868 Meiji Restoration to the present, an informative analysis of why the Japanese behave as they do.

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Border Film Project by Rudy Adler, Victoria Criado, and Brett Huneycutt

The Border Film Project's political backdrop and cultural context is the complex struggle for US immigration reform.

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Bronx Biannual by Miles Marshall Lewis [Editor]

With his selection of stories and mix of old and young Bronx-based writers, Lewis is exposing the side of the BX that many are too blinded with stereotypes to see.

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Confronting the New Conservatism by Michael J. Thompson [Editor]

It makes for worthy if sometimes scary reading as the United States slouches toward the 2008 election.

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Women Who Write by Stefan Bollmann

The category "women who write" has been interpreted in its broadest sense, to refreshing effect.

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No One Belongs Here More Than You: Stories by Miranda July

Anxiety-ridden souls find salvation in life's small challenges.

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New Stories from the South by Edward P. Jones (Guest Editor) and Kathy Pories (Series Editor)

The best of these stories drive their characters to a point where, as Edward P. Jones puts it, their world has shifted, in small or large ways.

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Cheney: The Untold Story of Americas Most Powerful and Controversial Vice President

Hayes rejects the view of Cheney as a master puppeteer who manipulates the president and pulls policy strings through loyalists planted throughout the executive branch.

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Wrestling Babylon by Irvin Muchnick

By watching the events, by cheering them on, by purchasing the books and DVDs, what part are we playing in sending these people to early graves?

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7 Aug 2007 // 10:59 PM

The Hellenistic Age: A Short History by Peter Green

Provides an interesting and well-written overview of a historical period that Green aptly describes as covering "some of the most crucial and transformational history of the ancient world."

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Poison Woman by Christine L. Marran

The most infamous of the "Poison Women" became notorious because her every action upset the natural order.

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6 Aug 2007 // 10:59 PM

The Sirens of Baghdad: A Novel by Yasmina Khadra

Its gripping descriptions of the world as seen through the eyes of a simple young man deeply centered in culture and tradition provide a lesson on how actions can turn a friend into a very dangerous foe.

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6 Aug 2007 // 10:58 PM

New England White by Stephen L. Carter

Carter has found a way to educate readers about this "secret" class without boring them with historical footnotes or explanations about the source of their wealth.

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