Reviews > Books
The Almost Moon by Alice Sebold

Alice Sebold has achieved in The Almost Moon something vastly more resonant and real than the fairy tale that made her name.

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29 Oct 2007 // 10:59 PM

The Nine by Jeffrey Toobin

Toobin's principal contribution is the way he brings the individual members of the court alive as people in describing their roles.

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Revolution in the Head by Ian MacDonald

In spite of some troubling, reactionary views, the late MacDonald's song-by-song analysis of the Fabs' music remains a Top Five acquisition.

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Heart-Shaped Box by Joe Hill

An out-to-pasture death-metal rock star with a penchant for occult objects -- drawings by John Wayne Gacy, a snuff film -- bids on the internet for a ghost and wins it.

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The Heroin Diaries: A Year in the Life of a Shattered Rock Star by Nikki Sixx

Sixx invites readers into the depths of his psyche and addictive past, leaving them to draw their own conclusions about the Hell they've just visited.

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25 Oct 2007 // 10:59 PM

The Complete Poetry: A Bilingual Edition by César Vallejo

Today Vallejo, the bard of Peru, has a place among the finest of his century's poets.

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24 Oct 2007 // 11:00 PM

The Feasting Season by Nancy Coons

Pick up The Feasting Season, a bottle of red wine, and enjoy this delicious tale of loyalty, adventure, and the journey of self-discovery.

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24 Oct 2007 // 10:59 PM

Trespass by Valerie Martin

Trespass deftly weaves tales of intruders and the people who fear them.

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Contested Lands by Sumantra Bose

Bose seeks out solutions to five festering territorial disputes, not scapegoatsm. His intellectual honesty and sense of even-handed purpose holds steadfast admirably.

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23 Oct 2007 // 10:59 PM

Spook Country by William Gibson

Apparently some critics look at Gibson's work and think, "Mmm, no coherent story, big reputation -- that must mean it's lit'rature!"

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The Prince by Hushang Golshiri

In early 20th century Iran, old-fashioned photographs prompt a distorted fever-dream journey through memory for one of the last members of the fading nobility.

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22 Oct 2007 // 10:59 PM

The Spiritual Brain by Mario Beauregard and Denyse OLeary

As a guide to the war zone from the antimaterialist perspective, it's a valuable read.

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22 Oct 2007 // 10:58 PM

Orpheus Lost by Janette Turner Hospital

Beautifully written and disturbing, the book takes us from earth to underworld as a mathematician and a musician repeat the roles of Eurydice and Orpheus, with a few twists.

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1776 by David McCullough

It’s one thing to simply read Washington’s words as they are related through the eyes and pen of an intermediary like McCullough, but to hold in your hands a faithful recreation of his original letter, to follow the loops and valleys of his script handwriting -- this experience significantly personalizes the history.

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21 Oct 2007 // 10:59 PM

The Tenderness of Wolves by Stef Penney

There's history, adventure, wit, and suspense. It's no surprise that the book won Britain's Costa Book of the Year in 2006.

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Strange Skies by Matt Marinovich

In Paul Mauro, writer Matt Marinovich may have created one of the most immediately unlikable antiheroes in some time.

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18 Oct 2007 // 10:59 PM

Brother, Im Dying by Edwidge Danticat

Danticat comes head-on at the painful tale she has to tell, with results that are both eloquent and devastating.

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How the Irish Invented Slang by Daniel Cassidy

Those who have controlled words have had the power to shape the world around them, and to confer, seize, or retain the social status. This book, alas, doesn't harness that power.

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17 Oct 2007 // 10:59 PM

How to Read the Bible by James L. Kugel

This book efficiently lays bare the challenges presented in Bible texts and the different ways of dissecting them, new and old.

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16 Oct 2007 // 11:00 PM

Redemption Song: The Ballad of Joe Strummer by Chris Salewicz

Redemption Song is quite an achievement, as it is not only the definitive account of Strummer’s life as its title promises, but also adds an important perspective to the existing literature on the Clash.

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"This is an interactive story in which players don’t craft the characters, we just control them.

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