Reviews > Books

6 Aug 2006 // 11:00 PM

1973 Nervous Breakdown by Andreas Killen

As Killen states, the '70s were a "decade of oedipal crises" that "have reemerged with new intensity in our own time."

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3 Aug 2006 // 11:00 PM

JPod by Douglas Coupland

What's missing from JPod altogether is a sense of the increasingly participatory nature of online culture.

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I Hate Myself and Want to Die: The 52 Most Depressing Songs You’ve Ever Heard

Reynolds serves as an admirable tour guide through his murderers' row of craptastically depressing tunes.

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31 Jul 2006 // 11:00 PM

The Ruins by Scott Smith

The set-up is a tour-de-force, but unfortunately, once you've been lured in, you start to feel like the victim of a bait-and-switch.

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The Economics of Attention: Style and Substance in the Age of Information by Richard Lanham

Instead of trying to force the idea of total paradigm shift, Lanham instead embraces the possibilities of paradigm oscillation.

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25 Jul 2006 // 11:00 PM

Youre Not You by Michelle Wildgen

Wildgen balances the debate by making it a question of trust, not a question of assisted suicide.

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Hong Kong Connections by Meaghan Morris, Siu Leung Li, Stephen Chan Ching-kiu (editors)

It makes sense that Hong Kong -- a region with a confused identity -- would produce cinema both local and universal.

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23 Jul 2006 // 11:00 PM

Kamikaze Diaries by Emiko Ohnuki-Tierney

No matter how much they read, how hard they attempted to justify their deaths, the boy pilots ultimately felt lost, afraid to die alone.

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Altman on Altman by David Thompson [editor]

Altman has quite an anecdotal history among his faithful. Any book that claims to dig deeper really has to deliver.

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19 Jul 2006 // 2:00 AM

Heartbreaker by John Meyer

Meyer pulls no punches when he describes Garland's ravenous need for Ritalin and vodka. Still, it never feels like he's just reaching for cheap, gossipy prose.

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18 Jul 2006 // 2:00 AM

Tamerlane by Justin Marozzi

How is it possible to botch a biography of Temur? This is a man who rode his Tatar hordes across Asia, leaving ravaged cities and towering piles of skulls in his wake.

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Yann Andrea Steiner by Marguerite Duras

'Like all men, every day, even if only for a few instants, you become a killer of women.' Whose rage is she describing? With outstanding writing like this, it doesn't matter.

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Play Between Worlds by T.L. Taylor

If you have no intention of ever playing EverQuest but are still curious about what sort of spells clerics can cast and the contingent ethics of 'kill stealing', this text is for you.

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12 Jul 2006 // 2:00 AM

The Book of Trouble by Ann Marlowe

For priding ourselves on being so advanced in comparison to what we view as outdated ways of love -- arranged marriage and traditional housewives -- there's a lot of discontent.

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11 Jul 2006 // 2:00 AM

We Are All Welcome Here by Elizabeth Berg

Berg is such a marvelous writer than she can keep you eagerly reading on for 150-plus pages even when the plot arc is a flat line.

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American Taxation, American Slavery by Robin Einhorn

By forcefully and persuasively offering a new interpretation of American history, Robin Einhorn has provided the raw material upon which popularizers in the mass media can build. Let us hope they do.

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7 Jul 2006 // 2:00 AM

Once in a Lifetime by Gavin Newsham

In recounting the team's rise to prominence, Newsham mixes in numerous pop culture and historical references that help place this moment in time.

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The Sociopath Next Door by Martha Stout, PhD

It is so tastefully informative, well-written, and kindly, that you feel like you're having a cup of tea with a brilliant friend who studies the varieties of sociopathy the way one might memorize every breed of rose.

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5 Jul 2006 // 2:00 AM

Laurel Canyon by Michael Walker

Does anyone who might be interested in this book need a lengthy recitation of the Woodstock or Altamont festivals, and their subsequent psychological impact?

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29 Jun 2006 // 12:00 AM

The Husband by Dean Koontz

After you demand that evil be given an uppercase E, what do you do next, agitate for a more Gothic font?"

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