Reviews > Books
Ruth Ozeki on Making Peace With the Mirror

What did her face look like before her parents were born? Ruth Ozeki decided to find out.

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Living by the Word in Jooyoung Lee’s ‘Blowin’ Up: Rap Dreams in South Central’

Blowin’ Up peers into the world of hip-hop as it is lived by some of the art form’s most dedicated practitioners.

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‘Under the Harrow’ Is a Gripping Exploration Into Grief, Manipulation and Jealosy

Under the Harrow's narrator will leave you both empathetic to what she bears and enraged at what she becomes.

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Barbara Freese Reminds Us: Power Over Nature Is Bought at a Great Price

This new edition of Coal is a compulsively readable history of how coal made the modern world, and of modern attempts to to make a world without coal.

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‘Back to the Fifties’ Points the Finger Directly at the Rise of Ronald Reagan

Back to the Fifties sheds light on the politicized motivations behind the pop cultural revisionist view of the Fifties in the wake of the tumultuous Sixties.

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‘Adultery’ Makes a Legal Argument With Clarity

Deborah L. Rhode examines infidelity in a variety of arenas; from the military to politics, from marriage to alternative lifestyles.

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‘Global Punk’: The Longevity of Punk Encourages

No previous survey of punk has likely examined a Celtic band from Indonesia, or swept across the Basque Country, Poland, and Edinburgh as well as Long Island, Chicago, or Austin.

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‘Horses, Horses, In the End the Light Remains Pure’

Hideo Furukawa’s journey into Fukushima, post 3/11, is a journey into overlapping, concentric circles.

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James Thomas Shares His Oddball Sensibilities in Book Form

Why the Long Joke? is the perfect anecdote to all of the sad and terrible news and information with which we are pummeled on a daily basis.

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‘The Naked Blogger of Cairo’ Combines Erudition With Style and Wit

Dwelling on the role of social media in political upheaval risks ignoring the human body, which lies at the root of creative insurgency.

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‘Warren Zevon: Desperado of Los Angeles’ and the Balance of Fandom and Criticism

George Plasketes has to balance fan appreciation and critical detachment here. He succeeds in providing a deep compendium of all things Zevon.

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In ‘Cool Characters’, a Cultural Monstrosity Is Wrangled

Lee Konstantinou provides America with the definition of "Irony" it probably needs. As long as there's a dictionary nearby.

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‘Country Comes to Town’ Illuminates Nashville’s and Country Music’s Internal Struggles

A fascinating piece of analysis about Music City, USA, Jeremy Hill's book is a thoughtful and thorough urban scholarship on origins and authenticity, among other things.

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Who Doesn’t Love the Smell of New Book?

"The sensual experience of reading still exerts its hold on us, as does the desire to represent and display our knowledge, attitudes, and passions on our bookshelves."

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Thomas-Christopher-Greene’s Well-Crafted Vignettes in ‘If I Forget You’

Green’s new novel takes about 30 pages to get used to, but once our seatbelts are securely fastened and we have attained cruising altitude, it's difficult to put down.

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If Only ‘Everything Is Teeth’ Had Been Content to Remain a Mood Piece

It's as though Wyld is, ironically, scared of writing a story willing to give fear its due.

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Yearning for Re-enchantment With the World in Jessa Crispin’s ‘The Dead Ladies Project’

Meditations on love, life, and art in a book that combines travel writing and memoir with cultural criticism.

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‘Life Moves Pretty Fast’ Hits Some Slowdowns

Freeman frequently complains about Hollywood's stereotypes about what male and female audiences are willing to watch, yet her own tastes are pretty stereotypical.

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‘Worlds Elsewhere’ Makes Clear: Shakespeare Is What We Make of Him

Dickson takes readers on a journey of the many Shakespeares in our world; from an entertainer in Gold Rush bars, to the defender of freedom in apartheid South Africa, to a founder of communism.

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‘Bukowski In a Sundress’ Is a Book You Should Judge By Its Cover

Kim Addonzio's memoir in essay ain't no summer beach read. Be very happy.

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Saul Williams Commands Attention at Summerstage (Photos + Video)

// Notes from the Road

"Saul Williams played a free, powerful Summerstage show ahead of his appearance at Afropunk this weekend.

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