Reviews > Books
‘Three Stones Make a Wall’, an Introduction to Archaeology, Struggles Against Its Genre Boundaries

The blur that this book will "engage all readers no matter what their background", I'm afraid, I find myself constrained to differ.

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Radiohead Music Theory, Pure and Simple

The most intelligent bunch of musicians to ever sell out an arena are the subject of rich, in-depth critical analysis. Have a highlighter and headphones handy.

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Retro Film Theory Feels Important but Romantically Distant in ‘On the Eve of the Future’

As hybrid art critic-scholar, Annette Michelson writes with a complex beauty that toggles between mechanical and poetic.

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The Dark, Funny, Subversive Chamber of Angela Carter’s Imagination

In this expansive yet detailed and nuanced biography, Edmund Gordon allows the complex and endlessly fascinating Angela Carter to come alive on the page again

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Does Western Civilization Owe a “Classical Debt” to Greece?

Hanink takes us on an exploration of ancient and modern Greece, showing how our ideas of classical antiquity can have powerful implications for how we think about the present.

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‘Complicated Fun’ Is a Thorough Study of the Glory Days of the Twin Cities Punk and Indie Scenes

The tales of a record store, a set of like-minded club owners, and a record label all tie together into a beautiful narrative of the burgeoning Minneapolis music scene.

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‘Making Sense’ Provides a Fresh, Logical Approach to Grammar

Teaching grammar is like holding water. You just can’t get a grip. That's where David Cyrstal's Making Sense comes in.

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‘Popular’: You Are Not Fated to Be Disliked

Adolescent psychologist Mitch Prinstein's new study of popularity, Popular, confirms the worst and hopes for the best.

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‘The Abominable Mr. Seabrook’ Explores a Life Lived From Inside a Bottle

Fleshing out the man behind the term ‘zombie’ and questionable claims of cannibalism, cartoonist Joe Ollmann presents a holistic look at the fascinating, though largely forgotten, life of William Seabrook.

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Animal Wives and Animal Husbands—It Goes Way Beyond Belle and the Beast

Sexuality, economics, cultural norms, the other, and self-sacrifice: these and other themes are shared in the globally diverse telling of the classic Beauty and the Beast.

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What Can Women do? Pretty Much Anything: ‘Wonder Women’

"We have to get the stories of these women out into the world. Because representation matters."

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‘Apollo in the Age of Aquarius’: Bringing the Space Race Back Down to Earth

Looking at NASA's interactions with the social movements of the '60s offers a new perspective on that landmark era in America.

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Is Money the Root of All Good?

A celebrated philosopher wonders if everything we believe about money is all wrong.

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As a Way of Being in the World, to Be Cool Is to Be a Fascinating Asshole

Cool seems to be a phenomenon located mainly between the end of Hitler’s war and the beginning of Kurt Cobain’s band.

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Movies Matter in ‘Talking Pictures’

Critic Ann Hornaday’s clear-eyed, unpretentious guide to watching cinema is a long overdue call for thoughtful appreciation in our time of media overload.

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War and the Novel of Integrity in ‘The Story of a Brief Marriage’

A brief, brutal, and exquisite novel set over the course of one day in a man's life in the refugee camps of war-torn northern Sri Lanka.

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‘Dear Ijeawele’, Dear Tired Church Ladies

Adichie's excellent and urgent feminist undertaking is a shot in the arm that doesn’t hurt at all.

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Nick Laird’s ‘Modern Gods’ and Restless Protagonists

Modern Gods veers away from its trajectory, but it lingers askew.

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A Mother and Her Trans Son Try to Connect ‘At the Broken Places’

Can a mother and trans son write their way out of the rift that tore them apart?

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Junot Díaz’s Favorite Short Stories: the Future of American Literature Shines Bright

After finishing this compilation, I knew I preferred the puncture wounds of a lethal short story to the blunt force trauma of a novel.

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How It Slips Away: 'The Breaking Point' Crosses Hemingway With Noir

// Short Ends and Leader

"Whether we've seen or read the story before, we ache for these sympathetic, floundering people presented to us gravely and without cynicism, even when cynical themselves.

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