Reviews > Books
San Francisco Noir by Peter Maravelis

Out there on the foggy edge on the continent, with its outlaw history, mad riot of architecture and strangely cold sun, San Francisco casts some long, weird shadows.

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5 Dec 2005 // 1:00 AM

Japanland: A Year in Search of Wa by Karin Muller

The chaos of the crowd struggling to board the last train out of Tokyo at midnight is so wonderfully suffocating, the rigidness of sumo training so extreme, that they beg to be witnessed in person.

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Veronica by Mary Gaitskill

Sex may be a physical act, but it's a psychological response. In this respect then, Gaitskill is an author of interiors.

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Dr. Futurity by Philip K. Dick

By using the previous genocide of the native residents of North America as a futuristic rallying cry for his characters, Dick delivers an interesting epic without a great deal of technical wizardry or speculative mumbo jumbo.

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30 Nov 2005 // 1:00 AM

Continued by Piotr Sommer

Nearly every poem springs from/exists in the Relentlessly Everyday.

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29 Nov 2005 // 1:00 AM

Speak Now by Kaylie Jones

The novel suggests that, if not faced -- if only medicated away, as both Clara and Mark have been wont to do -- shadows of the past will permeate the present.

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Spice: the History of a Temptation by Jack Turner

The allure of spice lives on in the present, although certainly in a less rarified atmosphere than in its heyday.

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23 Nov 2005 // 1:00 AM

Surrender by Sonya Hartnett

Surrender is a novel about a young boy made to bear an unbearable burden, and about the bargains he strikes to sustain himself.

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Lennon Revealed by Larry Kane

Former journalist Kane's flawed but passionate take on Lennon succeeds because of its flaws -- not unlike Lennon himself.

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22 Nov 2005 // 1:00 AM

Willful Creatures: Stories by Aimee Bender

The stories that hover closer to reality fixate wonderfully on the dynamics of female relationships and the sometimes absurdity, cattiness, and masochism that accompany them.

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The Complete Short Novels by Anton Chekhov

In the space of these five short works the conscientious reader can chart the gradual awakening of a major talent.

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Is Bill Cosby Right? Or Has the Black Middle Class Lost Its Mind? by Michael Eric Dyson

I admit I never saw Cliff and Claire attending a 'Free Mumia Abu Jamal' rally. But, then again, I never saw JJ, Re-Run, or Lionel out fighting for the cause of freedom either.

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Consuming Kids: Protecting Our Children from the Onslaught of Marketing and Advertising by Susan Lin

A puppeteer who regularly appeared on Mister Roger's Neighborhood, Linn alleges that the children's marketing industry is making kids fat, unimaginative, materialistic, and insensitive.

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Last of the Cold War Spies: The Life of Michael Straight by Roland Perry

There is no smoking gun, so Perry examines each phase of Straight's life and sees dastardly deeds wherever he treads.

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Perfect Example by John Porcellino

The cumulative effect is quite powerful, the equivalent of an epic poem told in a series Zen koans.

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‘Salem’s Lot: Illustrated Edition by Stephen King

Since Carrie was about telekinesis -- not the most classical of creature features -- 'Salem's Lot represents King's first stab a legitimate horror archetypes, and as he would go on to prove time and time again, no one can rework the classics better than he.

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10 Nov 2005 // 1:00 AM

99 Ways to Tell a Story: Exercises in Style by Matt Madden

By modeling 99 Ways after the work of a prose writer, Madden holds his work alongside works of literature -- asserting comics' place in the literary realm.

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Wordplay: The Philosophy, Art and Science of Ambigrams by John Langdon

It's fitting then that, as Da Vinci Code mania reaches a ridiculous fever pitch (in preparation for the 2006 big screen version) Langdon and Broadway Books are dusting off Wordplay for a new reprinting.

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8 Nov 2005 // 1:00 AM

On Beauty by Zadie Smith

What On Beauty lacks in stylistic verve, it makes up for in overarching, mammoth storytelling.

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Neil Gaiman’s The Sandman and Joseph Campbell: In Search of the Modern Myth by Stephen Rauch

Rauch takes The Sandman on its own terms, as a comic book, not as a paper movie, or as a piece of disposable pop culture.

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Country Fried Rock: Drivin' N' Cryin' to Be Inducted into the Georgia Music Hall of Fame

// Sound Affects

""If Drivin' N' Cryin' sounded as good in the '80s as we do now, we could have been as big as Cinderella." -- Kevn Kinney

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