Reviews > Books
The Mexican Masked Wrestler and Monster Filmography by Robert Michael “Bobb” Cotter

One of just three books published about Mexican wrestling films, Cotter's excels in providing the most information and the best laid out history of the genre so far.

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18 Jul 2005 // 1:00 AM

10:01 by Lance Olsen

Imagine if Ulysses had began with a paragraph like this: 'Leopold Bloom wondered what it would be life if the sum total of the verisimilitude of life and living could be summed up metaphorically in one day, quite coincidentally shaped to provide allegorical parallels to Homer's Odyssey.'"

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15 Jul 2005 // 1:00 AM

‘1215’ Slays Many Mythical Dragons

1215 is a fascinating, entertaining book that explicates one of the most import documents in Western Civilization.

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78 Reasons Why Your Book May Never Be Published and 14 Reasons Why It Just Might by Pat Walsh

Walsh's advice is not for the sensitive. He comes out swinging with the very first reason your book will not be published: you have not written it.

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Monkey Business: The True Story of the Scopes Trial by Dr. Marvin Olasky and John Perry

Olasky and Perry feel that creationists got a bad shake in the Scopes trial due to a liberal media bias, and that the time is nigh for a new battle.

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Meet the Beatles: A Cultural History of the Band That Shook Youth, Gender, and the World by Steven D

At the outset of this interesting and often incisive cultural history, Steven Stark tackles this obvious question: 'Why on earth would anyone need another book about the Beatles?'"

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How to Lose Your Ass and Regain Your Life: Reluctant Confessions of a Big-Butted Star by Kirstie All

The most refreshing aspect of Kirstie Alley's story is that it's her story -- find yourself offended by that triple-X laundry service comment? Doesn't matter, this isn't your fat-experience.

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This Is Pop: In Search of the Elusive at Experience Music Project by Eric Weisbard

'Creativity has become reduced to taste games,' says Reynolds, and thus 'music for music's sake' has become the primary force driving the authorial role in pop. Will someone knight this guy, already?"

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Richard’s Poor Almanac by Richard Thompson

In the realm of modern newspaper publishing, a strip like Richard's Poor Almanac is an anomaly. The well-documented homogenization of the funny pages has resulted in increasingly generalized and toothless strips aimed straight at the largest possible demographics.

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1 Jul 2005 // 1:00 AM

A Long Way Down by Nick Hornby

Suicide strikes me as a singularly solitary endeavor, but these four wankers all choose the one spot in all of London at the one time in all of the year when they'd be likely to encounter other suicidal roof-climbers.

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29 Jun 2005 // 1:00 AM

Acts of Faith by Philip Caputo

Doug and Quinette's Manichean worldview proves particularly disastrous when combined with a singularly American strain of optimism, a kind of militant Pollyanna spirit often expressed by neoconservatives and some liberal humanitarians.

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28 Jun 2005 // 1:00 AM

Thirty-Three Swoons: A Novel by Martha Cooley

Danny is a nagging, childish pain, Camilla's ex-husband is just too damn nice to be believable, and Camilla's best friend Stuart, the former mime now book shop owner, is the poster boy for the self-absorbed pretentious arty-farty.

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24 Jun 2005 // 1:00 AM

War by Candlelight by Daniel Alarcón

The revolutionary heart, truly the essence of the Lima depicted within these pages, never grows old.

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23 Jun 2005 // 1:00 AM

Black Virgin Mountain by Larry Heinemann

Heinemann launches into a second-person narrative guiding the reader through a tense meditation as a soldier exploring the dark and dangerous unknown. The book breathes again (a stale, humid, underground breath) and it's as if we had never left the genuinely captivating part of his colorful brain.

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The Ocean at Home: An Illustrated History of the Aquarium by Bernd Brunner

Finding a way to keep the creatures alive made it possible for more folks, the average bourgeois, to keep a little of the sea in the front room.

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All Yesterday’s Parties: The Velvet Underground in Print: 1966-71 by Clinton Heylin

LA Free Press's Robert Gold gets the prize for best scatological-gastrointestinal conceit in a review, 'Her {Maureen Tucker's} heavy, continuous 4/4 outpouring on the drums slams into your bowels and crawls out your asshole.'"

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Snow White and Russian Red by Dorota Maslowska

A Polish novel that drolly depicts the country as a place where Snow White is a whore as love has been replaced by meaningless sex and strong drugs.

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16 Jun 2005 // 1:00 AM

Misfortune by Wesley Stace

Misfortune is a musically rousing treat, hitting Dickensonian notes with Stace's wistful prose.

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In a Queer Time & Place: Transgender Bodies, Subcultural Lives by Judith Halberstam

In a Queer Time displays Halberstam's sophisticated understanding of contemporary culture in a plain and engaging tone.

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14 Jun 2005 // 1:00 AM

Moondust: In Search of the Men Who Fell to Earth by Andrew Smith

Smith has clearly harboured a fascination with the moon landings since childhood and has translated this enthusiasm into a grown up project, properly researched and examined with the sober eye of adulthood.

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Truth and Other Restrictions: 'True Detective' - Episode 7 - "Black Maps and Motel Rooms"

// Channel Surfing

"Series creator Nic Pizzolatto constructs the entire season on a simple exchange: death seems to be the metaphysical wage of knowledge.

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