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Wednesday, October 23 2002

New Hollywood Cinema: An Introduction by Geoff King

King strips Hollywood bare of its glitz and glamour and unravels the main, and sadly, perhaps, even the only driving force of Hollywood, namely . . . profit margins . . .


Lynyrd Skynyrd: Remembering the Free Birds of Southern Rock by Gene Odom with Frank Dorman

America is currently besieged by a national campaign that places the Lynyrd Skynyrd and its music front and center in the pop cultural consciousness. . . .


In the Hand of Dante by Nick Tosches

Every so often, literature's long-forgotten greats make a comeback and entrench themselves within popular culture. This time, it's Dante Alighieri.


Wednesday, October 16 2002

Seinfeld: The Making of an American Icon by Jerry Oppenheimer

What readers get shouldn't be shocking to anyone who knew Seinfeld the show. Oppenheimer, mostly through oral testimonies of friends, relatives and neighbours, describes a man who is driven, focused, and isolated, who only looks after himself.


Pleased to See Me: 69 Very Sexy Poems by Neil Astley (ed.)

Neil Astley has collected together a sequence of poems that represent the range of ways that modern poets have addressed the questions of love, sex and their place in poetry.


One Nation Under Gods: A History of the Mormon Church by Richard Abanes

The Mormons comprise a significant part of this country's 'religious right,' or 'Moral Majority' as it is sometimes called. For those who don't consider themselves to be part of this group, it is fascinating to see once again how politics makes for some very strange bedfellows. And for those who do identify with the movement, it should be worthwhile to find out exactly who you 'are' in bed with.


The Impressionist by Hari Kunzru

Kunzru is trendy and hybrid himself (father Indian-Kashmiri, mother English) considering the firm grip that Indian writers have over the literary market. The Impressionist is really more of a British novel than an Indian one as is apparent in the writing.


Crossing Brooklyn Ferry: A Novel by Jennifer Fields

OK. Your book is ready and saved. Would you like to create another novel?"


Friday, October 11 2002

Dorothy Parker’s Elbow: Tattoos on Writers, Writers on Tattoos Edited by Kim Addonizio and Cheryl D

Everybody, inked or not, has an opinion of tattooing, whether it's viewed with fear, admiration, loathing, or 21st century cynicism.


Thursday, October 10 2002

The Nose: A Profile of Sex, Beauty, and Survival by Gabrielle Glaser

Just as we have overworked our ears to the point that we are nearly deaf and subjected our eyes to all sorts of visual clutter, we have overworked our noses to the point that our noses hardly know what to tell us.


Mr. Strangelove: A Biography of Peter Sellers by Ed Sikov

Sikov's book may be the most painful celebrity bio I've read since Albert Goldman's 'Elvis' (the similarities between the two men's lives are startling)...


The sting of the word was undercut, however, by the humorous voices Rushdie used to emulate his characters, obliging the audience to consider the dialogue and the many ways that the word can act as a political fulcrum in American society.


Wednesday, October 2 2002

Teen Angst? Naaah . . . by Ned Vizzini

It doesn't matter whether you're 16 or 65. You'll laugh out loud at this stuff.


Girl Imagined By Chance by Lance Olsen

At its heart, it is rumination on the art of photography.


Digital Hustlers: Living Large and Falling Hard in Silicon Alley by Casey Kait and Stephen Weiss

Serves as a diary of the main players involved in the heyday of New York's Alley.


Blue Latitudes: Boldly Going Where Captain Cook Has Gone Before by Tony Horwitz

The only real analogy for Capt. James Cooke, who resolutely explored the Pacific between 1768 and 1780, is Capt. James Kirk, captain of the starship Enterprise.


Wednesday, September 25 2002

Alaska Quarterly Review

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The Terrible Gift: The Brave New World of Genetic Medicine by Rick J. Carlson and Gary Stimeling

Offering a rowdy soapbox monologue on a host of discoveries in genetic medicine -- including genetic technology, computerized biochemistry, and drug synthesis -- The Terrible Gift reveals not one, but two, terrible things.


Portrait of My Lover as a Horse by Selima Hill

Words revel in their incongruous, promiscuous juxtapositions, and sentences begin sensibly and end in bewildering confusions of logic . . .


It’s a Free Country: Personal Freedom in America After September 11 by Edited by Danny Goldberg, Vic

More than 300 books have been published since the fall of 2001 trying to explain, blame, comfort and inform us about what led up to the attacks and what we can expect next.


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