Reviews > Books
Postmortem: How Medical Examiners Explain Suspicious Deaths by Stefan Timmermans

Each chapter is interesting and informative, full of historical anecdotes, careful accounts of autopsy procedure, and thorough explanations of forensic logic.

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22 Aug 2006 // 12:00 AM

The Boy Detective Fails by Joe Meno

Meno's writing is clever and whimsical, yet a feeling of quiet solemnity pervades.

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21 Aug 2006 // 12:00 AM

Pound for Pound by F.X. Toole

When F.X. Toole went into the hospital for heart surgery in 2002 with 900 pages of the unfinished manuscript that would become Pound for Pound, he said, 'Doc, get me just a little more time, I gotta finish my book.' He didn't get it.

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17 Aug 2006 // 12:00 AM

Black Swan Green by David Mitchell

For all that Black Swan Green seals itself in childhood, it dually seals itself off from children.

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15 Aug 2006 // 12:00 AM

What Gets Into Us by Moira Crone

Like the works of Flannery O'Connor, this collection transcends the genre of "Southern Literature" and probes deeply into the paradoxes of the psyche and the zeitgeist of modern America.

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The One Percent Doctrine by Ron Suskind

Unfortunately, as Suskind relates, the mistakes caused by Cheney's doctrine -- a strange mix of interventionist brio and isolationist no-nothing-ism -- would begin to backfire on the actors almost immediately. And so came the torture.

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11 Aug 2006 // 12:00 AM

Lost Sounds by Tim Brooks

This week: Lost Sounds: Blacks and the Birth of the Recording Industry, 1890-1919 by Tim Brooks.

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10 Aug 2006 // 12:00 AM

Making Easy Listening by Tim J. Anderson

In Making Easy Listening: Material Culture and Postwar American Recording, Tim J. Anderson shifts the focus away from more familiar approaches to popular music studies in favor of an examination of the creation of the cultural objects, techniques, and industries that played a significant role in popular music as we know it today.

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9 Aug 2006 // 12:00 AM

Seaworthy by T.R. Pearson

Pearson's style provides the reader a welcoming warmth that contrasts with the frigid cold Willis felt on his travels.

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8 Aug 2006 // 12:00 AM

BOFFO! by Peter Bart

Wherever audience and critical reaction has fused together to create a cultural consensus of "this stinks" or "this is amazing," Bart will be right there, ready to nod along with the best of them, and to tell everyone why everyone is right.

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7 Aug 2006 // 12:00 AM

1973 Nervous Breakdown by Andreas Killen

As Killen states, the '70s were a "decade of oedipal crises" that "have reemerged with new intensity in our own time."

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4 Aug 2006 // 12:00 AM

JPod by Douglas Coupland

What's missing from JPod altogether is a sense of the increasingly participatory nature of online culture.

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I Hate Myself and Want to Die: The 52 Most Depressing Songs You’ve Ever Heard

Reynolds serves as an admirable tour guide through his murderers' row of craptastically depressing tunes.

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1 Aug 2006 // 12:00 AM

The Ruins by Scott Smith

The set-up is a tour-de-force, but unfortunately, once you've been lured in, you start to feel like the victim of a bait-and-switch.

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The Economics of Attention: Style and Substance in the Age of Information by Richard Lanham

Instead of trying to force the idea of total paradigm shift, Lanham instead embraces the possibilities of paradigm oscillation.

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26 Jul 2006 // 12:00 AM

Youre Not You by Michelle Wildgen

Wildgen balances the debate by making it a question of trust, not a question of assisted suicide.

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Hong Kong Connections by Meaghan Morris, Siu Leung Li, Stephen Chan Ching-kiu (editors)

It makes sense that Hong Kong -- a region with a confused identity -- would produce cinema both local and universal.

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24 Jul 2006 // 12:00 AM

Kamikaze Diaries by Emiko Ohnuki-Tierney

No matter how much they read, how hard they attempted to justify their deaths, the boy pilots ultimately felt lost, afraid to die alone.

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Altman on Altman by David Thompson [editor]

Altman has quite an anecdotal history among his faithful. Any book that claims to dig deeper really has to deliver.

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19 Jul 2006 // 3:00 AM

Heartbreaker by John Meyer

Meyer pulls no punches when he describes Garland's ravenous need for Ritalin and vodka. Still, it never feels like he's just reaching for cheap, gossipy prose.

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The Moving Pixels Podcast Looks at the Scenic Vistas and Human Drama of 'Firewatch'

// Moving Pixels

"This week we consider the beautiful world that Campo Santo has built for us to explore and the way that the game explores human relationships through its protagonist's own explorations within that world.

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