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Friday, October 11 2002

Dorothy Parker’s Elbow: Tattoos on Writers, Writers on Tattoos Edited by Kim Addonizio and Cheryl D

Everybody, inked or not, has an opinion of tattooing, whether it's viewed with fear, admiration, loathing, or 21st century cynicism.


Thursday, October 10 2002

The Nose: A Profile of Sex, Beauty, and Survival by Gabrielle Glaser

Just as we have overworked our ears to the point that we are nearly deaf and subjected our eyes to all sorts of visual clutter, we have overworked our noses to the point that our noses hardly know what to tell us.


Mr. Strangelove: A Biography of Peter Sellers by Ed Sikov

Sikov's book may be the most painful celebrity bio I've read since Albert Goldman's 'Elvis' (the similarities between the two men's lives are startling)...


The sting of the word was undercut, however, by the humorous voices Rushdie used to emulate his characters, obliging the audience to consider the dialogue and the many ways that the word can act as a political fulcrum in American society.


Wednesday, October 2 2002

Teen Angst? Naaah . . . by Ned Vizzini

It doesn't matter whether you're 16 or 65. You'll laugh out loud at this stuff.


Girl Imagined By Chance by Lance Olsen

At its heart, it is rumination on the art of photography.


Digital Hustlers: Living Large and Falling Hard in Silicon Alley by Casey Kait and Stephen Weiss

Serves as a diary of the main players involved in the heyday of New York's Alley.


Blue Latitudes: Boldly Going Where Captain Cook Has Gone Before by Tony Horwitz

The only real analogy for Capt. James Cooke, who resolutely explored the Pacific between 1768 and 1780, is Capt. James Kirk, captain of the starship Enterprise.


Wednesday, September 25 2002

Alaska Quarterly Review

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The Terrible Gift: The Brave New World of Genetic Medicine by Rick J. Carlson and Gary Stimeling

Offering a rowdy soapbox monologue on a host of discoveries in genetic medicine -- including genetic technology, computerized biochemistry, and drug synthesis -- The Terrible Gift reveals not one, but two, terrible things.


Portrait of My Lover as a Horse by Selima Hill

Words revel in their incongruous, promiscuous juxtapositions, and sentences begin sensibly and end in bewildering confusions of logic . . .


It’s a Free Country: Personal Freedom in America After September 11 by Edited by Danny Goldberg, Vic

More than 300 books have been published since the fall of 2001 trying to explain, blame, comfort and inform us about what led up to the attacks and what we can expect next.


Modern Burma isn't so much a country as the residue of a British imperial political organization thrust onto several divergent peoples. To argue for ethnic independence is to argue for Burma's devolution, something the world community isn't likely to tolerate.


Into the Buzzsaw: Leading Journalists Expose the Myth of a Free Press by edited by Kristina Borjess

With almost one voice the essays contained here contend that the modern news business -- where the emphasis on the bottom line has almost trumped the traditional sanctity of the byline -- has become just that: a business.


The Accidental President: How 413 Lawyers, 9 Supreme Court Justices, and 5,963,110 Floridians (Give

The most remarkable portion of The Accidental President concerns the final Supreme Court decision that effectively appointed George W. Bush president. Most of the criticism leveled in the book is fairly light, but at the end Kaplan rips into the Supreme Court decision.


Monday, September 16 2002

Using the Force: Creativity, Community and Star Wars Fans by Will Brooker

For as much as Lucasfilms would like to be in control over its content, 'Star Wars' has grown too big to fit inside of Lucas' universe anymore. Nearly everyone alive today has a 'Star Wars' story to tell.


Toothpicks and Logos: Design in Everyday Life by John Heskett

Conveys the theory that almost nothing in our environment is completely natural.


This War Called Love by Alejandro Murguia

His narratives are crisp and filled with vivid descriptions of street life, reminding one of a painting that is packed with minute details.


The Season of Lillian Dawes by Katherine Mosby

A lush novel, thick with the heady atmosphere of first love, lust and betrayal, Katherine Mosby's sophomore effort, 'The Season of Lillian Dawes' is part 'Catcher in the Rye', part 'The Great Gatsby'. Original it ain't, but the author's fluid, lyrical prose makes it worth the deja vu.


Screening Party by Dennis Hensley

I'd like to take a moment to reflect upon the fine art of 'riposte au cinema', or talking back to the movies. It's one of those pursuits, like driving and sex, that most people attempt to do but few actually do well.


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