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Wednesday, August 28 2002

Outlaw Woman: A Memoir of the War Years 1960-1975 by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz

I thought of myself as a revolutionary...I wanted to see women liberated, thinking for ourselves, not just organized into a political constituency....


The Courage of Strangers: Coming of Age with the Human Rights Movement by Jeri Laber

In chronicling her life as a human rights activist, Laber reveals how human rights theory and practice can be wedded in such a way that both fields are enriched.


Wednesday, August 21 2002

Snobbery: The American Version by Joseph Epstein

Snobbery can be mocked, but at its core, it is a weak, malicious vice that shows our worst.


The Russian Debutante’s Handbook by Gary Shteyngart

To answer the question of 'What is America?' It could be a hamburger, a hot dog, a shiny Cadillac, and a pretty young woman underneath a palm tree, or all of these.


Nigger by Randall Kennedy

If hip-hop is as American as apple pie, then the language it uses, a language that some call coarse and others call authentic has become the currency of hipness and modernity.


High Life by Matthew Stokoe

Explores the lengths one man will go to for a shot at stardom, and to say those lengths are extreme would be an understatement.


Wednesday, August 14 2002

. . . a divide exists, between low and high art: genre novelists sell books while literary writers thrill critics. It is rare for an author to successfully straddle both worlds.


... this is devastating to Goldstein and Beloff, who really want to get their ass kicked in order to prove their southern bigotry theory.


eBay's business model has always been deceptively simple: low overhead, narrow focus, top-to-bottom accountability, and most of all, paying attention to its customers. In other words, conservatism. Radical.


Chopper's simple message rests in the fact that we shouldn't discriminate against people, even if they are they freakish son of the town whore.


Not only does he dig into a fine array of the social, cultural, economic, racial, and obviously athletic issues of those 12 years, giving us an often hilarious, occasionally heartbreaking, and almost always vigorous narrative of baseball and the lives of baseball players, but this narrative also establishes an accessible and important doorway for modern baseball folks to walk through.


Wednesday, August 7 2002

The Atlanta Review

Dan Veach, review by Gideon Kennedy -- Otherwise, unlike many literary magazines in which readers are more likely to flip through stopping at titles of interest, Atlanta Review print edition can be read comfortably from cover to cover. Because whatever land it happens to be selling, it knows the value of its real estate.


What Lamb manages brilliantly is to show us what happened to Vietnam after the American War (as it is referred to by the Vietnamese).


In reflecting on a prospective trip to New York, Twigger admits that Americans didn't seem 'to give a toss' about what he had to say. This book is not likely to change our attitude towards him that much.


Wednesday, July 31 2002

Taking the Train: How Graffiti Art Became an Urban Crisis in New York City. by Joe Austin

Austin points out the two chief discourses through which residents and visitors find meaning in the city: The Naked City or the New Rome. The New Rome is the pinnacle of civilization, the city where dreams are fulfilled, fame is won, and riches earned. The Naked City, on the other hand, is the seedy metropolis of noir films, where life is cheap and virtue meaningless.


A Thing (or Two) About Curtis and Camilla by Nick Fowler

But while the conditions and circumstances that afflict the characters are strange, their agonies, of loneliness and alienation, are universal; and Fowler's story aches with a hurt many people, who've loved and lost, should recognize.


Power Plays: Win or Lose—How History’s Great Political Leaders Play the Game by Dick Morris - Pop

... if you don't have natural charm, you sure aren't going to pick it up from a pedantic, dull as dirt book like 'Power Plays'.


Do No Harm by Gregg Andrew Hurwitz

Everyone involved will undoubtedly make shameful amounts of money from this splendid example of western decadence without ever questioning the ethics of what they've done.


Alan Ayckbourn: Grinning at the Edge by Paul Allen

The reader is left with a strong sense of the often violent pressures that build up in situations demanding extreme commitment for little financial reward, and how these pressures can affect individuals as well as teams of people.


Wednesday, July 24 2002

Happy

Bayard, Designer/Publisher: Dan Peyton, review by Phoebe Kate Foster -- That quality of raw honesty may set your teeth on edge or it may speak to your soul. It may infuriate you or give you a hearty laugh or bring tears to your eyes. You may throw 'Happy' across the room occasionally -- but more than likely, you'll retrieve it and go on reading.


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