Reviews > Books
Edison & the Electric Chair: A Story of Light and Death by Mark Essig

Essig combines together a mini-biography of Thomas Edison, a short history of capital punishment in America, wars over electricity and the evolution of the electric chair.

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Collected Poems 3: Poems 1997-2003 by Peter Reading

Reading invites the reader into a poetic world where the contemplation of natural beauty is an imperative in the face of its imminent destruction at the hand of man.

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Ultimate Punishment: A Lawyer’s Reflections on Dealing with the Death Penalty by Scott Turow

Ultimately, to Turow, the issue is one of moral proportion. The perpetrators of the most violent crimes, the most depraved of the depraved, would seem to warrant the most extreme of penalties.

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Everything and More: A Compact History of Infinity by David Foster Wallace

This account of infinity is enough to make a head reel, as paradoxes, mind games, and riddles that left the greatest minds in mathematics stumped for ages are packed into a matter of a few hundred pages.

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Cool for Cats by Jessica Adams

The debate as to the merits of chick lit continues to rage: Is it just about girls, gossip and getting laid, or is there something deeper to be found inside those rainbow-colored covers?"

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2 Dec 2003 // 1:00 AM

American Woman by Susan Choi

No matter how far they drive or how deep they hide, the fugitives cannot escape their compromised morality, their Americanness.

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19 Nov 2003 // 1:00 AM

The Rabbit Factory by Larry Brown

Being one, Larry Brown knows the true heart and mind of a native Southerner. He also knows grit like gruel.

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Mendocino and Other Stories by Ann Packer

Packer's importance couldn't be more evident as 2003 comes to a close with the ever-spreading Chick-Lit Disease threatening women's literature.

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Lost Christianities: The Battle for Scriptures and Faiths We Never Knew by Bart D. Ehrman

If there is disagreement, even animosity, between branches of Christianity today, it pales in comparison with the ideological battles waged in the first four or five centuries after Christ's birth.

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Fear Without Frontiers: Horror Cinema Across the Globe by Steven Jay Schneider

The very notion of foreignness, of frightening difference, is arguably what drives every horror movie.

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The Rat Pack: Neon Nights With the Kings of Cool by Lawrence J. Quirk and William Schoell

These guys were the first to embody the definition of "cool," and no entertainer since has managed to successfully emulate or capture their powerful allure.

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Rumsfeld: A Personal Portrait by Midge Dector

Dector has said that Rumsfeld is her attempt to speak directly to the American people over the heads of the media. But she's only interested in telling them what she and her fellow neocons want them to hear.

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Quickies 3: Short Short Fiction on Gay Male Desire by James C. Johnstone

But in the short short story, with only 1,500 words or less available, each comma must count. The story must be an assassin.

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Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood by Marjane Satrapi

Based on her own personal experience of the Islamic Revolution in Iran, Marjane Satrapi introduces us to the effects of cultural change through the eyes of a child.

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The Day the World Came to Town: 9/11 in Gander, Newfoundland by Jim DeFede

In the immediate aftermath of the attacks at the World Trade Center, 38 jetliners en route to the United States were re-directed to Gander. What occurred over the succeeding four days was an outpouring of what could be termed hospitality, although that word is barely adequate.

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5 Nov 2003 // 1:00 AM

Yellow Dog by Martin Amis

Perhaps more than any living writer, Martin Amis suffers for being who he is.

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The New Imperialism by David Harvey

The United States, David Harvey notes, has long sought to control the flow of oil from the Middle East as a way to maintain political and economic superiority.

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Lunch at the Picadilly by Clyde Edgerton

Clyde Edgerton, a combination of Mark Twain and Will Rogers, is the quintessential southern storyteller.

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Blood, Money & Power: How L.B.J. Killed J.F.K. by Barr McClellan

Painting a stark portrait of Johnson as a 'psychopath,' McClellan unravels a lurid tale of power, fear, and paranoia.

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The Tree of Life: A Book Depicting the Life of Charles Darwin by Peter Sís

Children need heroes. Science has many. Unfortunately, few of them have lived lives as adventuresome as Robin Hood.

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Double Take: The African Queen (1951)

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"What a time they had, Charlie and Rosie. They'll never lack for stories to tell their grandchildren. And what a time we had at Double Take discussing the spiritual and romantic journey of the African Queen.

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