Reviews > Books

22 Oct 2003 // 1:00 AM

My Cold War by Tom Piazza

As a phenomenologist, Delano recounts his childhood and family life in the same way he explores public history: by plundering the surfaces and small events for meaning.

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22 Oct 2003 // 1:00 AM

Lizard Dreaming of Birds by John Gist

John Gist's second novel isn't concerned with forensics and sleuthing; it simply surveys the ever-increasing carnage that Gist implies is symptomatic of our world gone wrong.

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22 Oct 2003 // 1:00 AM

Eagles and Angels by Juli Zeh

The real states here, though, are states of mind, and in particular those freaked-out mental states that characterise the tradition of drug-trade books and films from Burroughs to Welsh.

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Stalking the Divine: Contemplating Faith with the Poor Clares by Kristin Ohlson

Imagine a small group of cloistered nuns, right in the middle of Cleveland, who pray for the City, all day, all night. This is their calling. In 2003. Gives you chills, doesn't it? The Poor Clares of Perpetual Adoration, cloistered in a monastery, they're praying for you.

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16 Oct 2003 // 1:00 AM

Leaving You: The Cultural History of Suicide by Lisa Lieberman

The work is also a reminder of how the taking of one's own life can be representative of more than just depression, that rather, it can become, for better or worse, a deliberate act of independence.

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16 Oct 2003 // 1:00 AM

Charlie Big Potatoes by Phil Robinson

The novel appears to fear we might miss the message: You don't need chemicals to have a good time. In that way, despite Robinson's deftness of touch and sharpness of wit, the novel sometimes resembles M.A.D.D. filmstrip day or a Very Special edition of Maxim.

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16 Oct 2003 // 1:00 AM

Bodies by Jed Mercurio

Mercurio's main objective is to blow a big, fat hole in the E.R.-inspired non-reality that hospitals are dens of comfort and that all doctors are hunky heroes.

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A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson

While providing tremendous insight into the history of science and the study of the world at large, Bryson's most interesting observations lie in his fascinating description of said scientists and their peculiarities and obsessions.

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9 Oct 2003 // 1:00 AM

A Secret Burial by Penelope Sell

Growing up, Elise soon realizes, is as much about the turning of the clock as it is about circumstance. Dead mother or not, 15 is still 15.

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9 Oct 2003 // 1:00 AM

The Girls in 3-B / In a Lonely Place / Skyscraper

Pulp's classic 'femme fatale' is Clytemnestra in Chanel no. 5, all temptation, castration and, in her inevitable defeat, the eventual restoration of masculine order.

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9 Oct 2003 // 1:00 AM

Diary by Chuck Palahniuk

What's transpiring is equal parts incisive satire and artistic shell game from an audacious writer whose weakness is his emotional detachment from his characters and situations. Getting involved would not violate the rules of satire, although it might fly in the face of postmodern 'cool.'"

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Death Metal Music: The Passion and Politics of a Subculture by Natalie J. Purcell

The book might serve certain mainstream minds in opening them up to the legitimate vitality of this underground scene, and it might help to de-demonize some 'extreme' music.

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Scenes From a Long Sleep: New & Collected Poems by Peter Didsbury

He writes in the long tradition of the English eccentric, weirdly both inhabiting and residing somewhere outside of normal reality.

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25 Sep 2003 // 1:00 AM

Parasites Like Us by Adam Johnson

Set in the future, anthropology professor Hank Hannah recounts the happenings and peculiarities of modern Homo sapien life.

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Last to Die by James Grippando

The perfect combination of cocky superhero and romantic leading man, Swytek is a guy who's seen it all and lived to tell the tale.

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25 Sep 2003 // 1:00 AM

Journal of the Dead by Jason Kersten

Set in 'Rattlesnake' Canyon, New Mexico -- where the friends stop to camp for a night -- and stocked with colorful local characters, Journal of the Dead is steeped in elements of pulp fiction.

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War Against the Weak: Eugenics and America’s Campaign to Create a Master Race by Edwin Black

Uncovers a long-repressed chapter of social history significant enough to command reappraisal of the legacy of eugenics for today and for the future.

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17 Sep 2003 // 1:00 AM

Since the Layoffs by Iain Levison

We're simply rooting for the underdog to get back on his feet, to earn a paycheck, to settle into a routine.

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17 Sep 2003 // 1:00 AM

Jonah Sees Ghosts by Mark J. Sullivan, III

More successfully executed are Jonah's prophetic night dreams. Sullivan wisely withholds the specifics about this activity, which lends it a mystery the ghosts themselves lack.

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Autumn Glory: Baseball’s First World Series by Louis P. Masur

Reminds us that baseball a century ago was actually much like baseball now, with a few notable exceptions. Chief among them: 100 years ago, teams from Boston actually played in the postseason.

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