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Sunday, January 1 1995

GoTo by Steve Lohr

The story of computer languages is really the story of rock 'n' roll. It's the story of the exodus out from under the iron fist of early computing Rat Pack.


Gunman’s Rhapsody by Robert B. Parker

Next time Robert B. Parker decides to time-travel, especially when mucking about with mythology, he'd be well-advised to bring his 'old' shooting-irons with him.


The Ghastly One. The Sex-Gore Netherworld of Filmmaker Andy Milligan by Jimmy McDonough

Jimmy McDonough at one point describes Andy Milligan as 'one of those creatures who ride the midnight train, come from the land of the screaming skulls.' Even though we may not wish to take a journey on that vehicle or experience the territory from where it came, the ride is one I will not soon forget.


Fool’s Gold by Jane S. Smith

PULL.


Freakshow: Misadventures in the Counter-culture by Albert Goldman

By the end of an absorbing piece, Goldman concludes that rock acts 'like a magnet, drawing into its field a host of heterogeneous materials that has fallen quickly into patterns. No other cultural force in modern times has possessed its power of synthesis'.


PopMatters Books Review - University of Illinois Press: French Film Guides

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Fear and Loathing in America: The Brutal Odyssey of an Outlaw Journalist (The Gonzo Letters, volume

'Fear and Loathing in America' . . . helps distinguish the difference between a writer and the work, which has always been a source of aggravation for Thompson. . . the general assumption was that because he 'wrote' about being stoned, he always 'was'.


The Fish Can Sing by Halldór Laxness

... not only an important work by a Nobel laureate who brought his modern country lasting literary fame, but also the fascinating voice of an earlier, more insular Iceland.


Fixer Chao by Han Ong

Feng Shui is the so-called ancient Chinese art of arranging one's environment to promote peace and prosperity. Its popularity among the well-to-do in this country speaks volumes about how certain kinds of knowledge, including quasi-knowledge, are appropriated and consumed by different social classes. This is what makes 'Fixer Chao' so timely and worthwhile.


Falun Gong’s Challenge to China: Spiritual Practice or “Evil Cult”? by Danny Schechter

It's almost unbelievable, the scope of these abuses, and the sheer insanity of the accusations being made -- how on earth could a seventy-year-old grandmother, a former school principal and lifetime Communist Party member, be considered a 'dangerous revolutionary?'"


Fearless Jones by Walter Mosley

Punctuated by illicit sexual forays, bursts of rage, terse interpretations of 1950s middle-class Caucasian Judeo-Christian priorities, and a few songs of the Old South, 'Fearless Jones' leaves very few stones unturned.


Fast Food Nation by Eric Schlosser

As all-American as anything you can name, fast food has become a serious staple of our daily life and created a cult of franchises that extends into the clothing industry and beyond.


Fault Lines: Stories of Divorce by Caitlin Shetterly, editor

The Iwo Jima Memorial or the Wall at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial hasn't ended human conflict. But we do need those memorials, and we need these stories, if only to look at the names that hover in the shimmering black surface.


The First Measured Century: An Illustrated Guide to Trends in America, 1900-2000 by Theodore Caplow

During the course of the twentieth century - the first 'measured' entury - Americans became the most ambitious measurers of social life ever. All one has to do is open a newspaper or turn on the radio or television to find out just how our lives are affected, if not dictated, by key trends as a result of statistics.


FM: The Rise and Fall of Rock Radio by Richard Neer- PopMatters Book Review

The 'anything goes' attitude held by the DJs led to a variety of music being heard on stations in the early '70s that is unheard of today; what with 20 song playlists, marketing pushes from huge recording conglomerates on a small cadre of 'artists', and music produced by machines instead of instruments of wood and steel.


Flash Fortune by Todd Hayes

This week 'PopMatters' debuts a new feature, an irregular column devoted to issues on the electronic publishing frontier. In the first installment, Paul Sibley reviews Todd Hayes' 'Flash Fortune' and gives us a primer on the pros and cons of the e-book.


The Films of Lon Chaney by Michael F. Blake

A valuable reference tool for fans of the cinema and of Chaney.


The Fast Red Road - a Plainsong by Stephen Graham Jones

The Southwest of 'The Fast Red Road' is similar to Burroughs's Tangier, a place filled with shady characters and a native magic that bends its inhabitants to the edge of reality.


Esther’s Pillow by Marlin Fitzwater

Former White House press secretary Marlin Fitzwater rows across the river of historical fiction with both oars in the water. As the quintessential media man, Fitzwater can sure write the story. This time, though, his stake in his new novel, 'Esther's Pillow', is personal, as he reveals in an interview with 'PopMatters'.


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