Call for Essays About Any Aspect of Popular Culture, Present or Past

Reviews > Books

Sunday, January 1 1995

Comics & Ideology by McAllister, Matthew, Edward Sewell, and Ian Gordon, ed

The basic argument is that Superman must constantly be reinvented in order to appeal to new readers.


Chienne de Guerre: A Woman Behind the Lines of the War in Chechnya by Anne Nivat

Physical distance from Chechnya, from Palestine/Israel, from Rowanda, Albania, Guatemala, Kurdistan, Macedonia, and so on, for those of us who feel we have such distance, provides psychological comfort only. It provides no protection from the fallout from these wars.


The Chastening: Inside the Crisis that Rocked the Global Financial System and Humbled the IMF by Pau

When you read about how close the US came to tail spinning into financial oblivion, it can send chills along your spine.


Chum by Mark Spitzer

...dark, violent, funny, visceral, and incredibly profane -- an icepick in the gut and a sledgehammer to the skull.


Complications: A Surgeon’s Note on an Imperfect Science by Atul Gawande -  PopMatters Book Review

Gawande's writing style lends itself well to his compassionate voice. He explains everything clearly, without either confusing medical jargon or condescension to the reader.


Choke by Chuck Palahniuk

In an interview with 'PopMatters', Chuck Palahniuk talks about his new novel 'Choke', Nine Inch Nails, dissecting cadavers, his favorite writers, creating instant ancient relics, and why it's not such a bad thing to be known as 'the 'Fight Club' guy.'"


The Corrections by Jonathan Franzen

It is a veritable cornucopia of dysfunction, and because Franzen skewers American culture through the lens of one American family, the book has the potential to alienate large segments of the reading public, particularly, or at least in my experience, an older reading public.


Conspiracy Culture: From Kennedy to the X-Files by Peter Knight

... conspiracy theories are no longer the 'delusional rantings' of the fringe elements in society, but rather constitute 'many people's normal way of thinking about who they are and how the world works.'"


cool for you by Eileen Myles

Myles's voice is directed at the reader in a tone that veers between confession and questioning. Her stories are true, or at least they seem true to her.


Cobwebs and Whispers by Scott Thomas

All of the works in 'Cobwebs and Whispers' reflect a pagan sensibility, the forces of nature and darkness oftentimes at direct odds with Christianity, and always preceding and eventually overcoming it.


The Bone Museum: Travels in the Lost Worlds of Dinosaurs and Birds by Wayne Grady

His inclination to pursue ideas about bird and dinosaur evolution takes Grady deeply into the literature and the history of ideas. Grady explores why the Victorian mind, believing that God created the physical world whole and complete, was as disturbed about the idea of extinction as the idea of evolution.


Broadway, the Golden Years: Jerome Robbins and the Great Choreographer-Directors 1940 to the Present

The theater writer must, if he or she does nothing else, portray the performance so that it comes vividly alive in the readers minds eye, whether the portrait is flattering or not.


Bandwagon Effects in High Technology Industries by Jeffrey H. Rohlfs

A world where only two people have telephones is pretty useless. A world where a million people are all connected to a central telephone exchange is a gold mine.


Back When We Were Grownups by Anne Tyler

Rather than succumb to the crisis of identity suffered by the everyman, the ordinary person, Anne Tyler's novels contain characters who come to grips with the consequences of their choices and learn to appreciate their own reality, who begin to feel good in their own skin.


Borrowed Dress by Cathy Colman

...the poems themselves read like flash fiction, suspended moments and strident glimpses into the past as well as intrepid contemplation of the future.


Body Bizarre, Body Beautiful by Nan McNab

'Body Bizarre, Body Beautiful' is an MTV snapshot with bright colors and extended background layouts. It's mostly show and little content, belying the fact that beauty, as well as the reasons people feel for changing their bodies, is anything but skin deep.


The Beauty of the Husband by Anne Carson

The world finds fulfillment in beauty, is content to trace the outside of the package and forfeit all else. But there is a toll: unprofitable love culminates in anguish.


BoyGenius by Yongsoo Park

Transported by a magical blend of metaphor, illumination, and synergy, the plot drives forward down highways of illusion, twisting and turning through an elusive landscape of the bizarre.


The Body Artist by Don DeLillo

One suspects that a simple summary of what the book is 'about' will entirely miss the point; DeLillo's interest lies elsewhere, in the silences and gaps between words, in death and absence.


Now on PopMatters
Announcements
PM Picks

© 1999-2014 PopMatters.com. All rights reserved.
PopMatters.com™ and PopMatters™ are trademarks
of PopMatters Media, Inc.

PopMatters is wholly independently owned and operated.