Reviews > Books
Past and Present, Space and Time: The Script for ‘Harry Potter and the Cursed Child’

Though pasts and futures are undone and redone, by the end we are left where we began.

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Rob Sheffield’s ‘On Bowie’ Is a Textual Funeral for an Idol

Portrait of Rob Sheffield as a young American.

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In ‘You Will Know Me,’ the Mystery is Everybody

Megan Abbott’s novel of suburban gymnastics’ competitive psychosis is like the fictional version of Joan Ryan’s excoriating Little Girls in Pretty Boxes.

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‘American Candide’: A Modern Allegory on Nationalism

Candide and the gang take the gas out of the contemporary political landscape, capitalism, formal education, Hollywood and the news with a sarcastic flare.

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‘Jane Steele’, a Victorian Murderess With a Heart of Gold

This glossier and better-dressed creative reimagining of Jane Eyre falls short of the original, sacrificing depth for the usual pop culture tropes of liberal feminism.

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‘Jonathan Unleashed’: Nice Dogs, Too Bad About the Jokes

This shoots for the angsty New York comedy of Woody Allen, but it suffers from that which Allen so famously called grounds for divorce: insufficient laughter.

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‘The Star Trek Book’: This Is Why We Still Love Star Trek

Long before society caught up by heeding calls for diversity in education and the workplace, Star Trek was preaching "infinite diversity in infinite combinations" as a strength.

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‘In the Shadow of Frankenstein’ Will Haunt Your Dreams

In the Shadow of Frankenstein provides a first-rate example of how the creature's heart continues to pump life into the horror genre.

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Agatha: The Real Life of Agatha Christie

The new Agatha Christie biography is a graphic novel in form but a mere flipbook in narrative.

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‘Last Night, a Superhero Saved My Life’ Is Grounded in Reality

Recommended reading for those whose lives were saved in the nick of time, and were transformed into their better selves, thanks to Amazons, Caped Crusaders, and Mutants.

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The Life of a Navy Wife Is Told With Blazing Honesty in ‘The War At Home’

An existence of constant upheavals, classified work, and arcane cultural mores, the military is a peculiarly isolated place even as it runs parallel to civilian life.

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Race and Sci-fi Theory: Not Just for Dissertations Anymore

Ever thought Toni Morrison's Beloved has a place at ComicCon? Carringont's Speculative Blackness might be for you.

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The Warhol Paradox and ‘On&By Andy Warhol’

Andy Warhol seemed to always have it both ways. He was able to play high against low, simple against complex, present and yet far away, sexual/asexual, etc.

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There’s No Room for You in Hannah Tennant-Moore’s ‘Wreck and Order’

Our self-indulgent protagonist tries to find herself in the rural poverty of the third world but the people, the customs, the food, it all starts to grate on her first world sensibilities.

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‘The Age of Lovecraft’ Wonderfully Elucidates the Central Dilemma Posed by Lovecraft

The Age of Lovecraft asks readers to weigh his undeniable revulsion toward non-white, non-male bodies against his vision of a cosmos indifferent to all humans.

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A Smart But Brief Look at the Undervalued Half of the World’s Population

Who Cooked Adam Smith’s Dinner? is a sharply written book on economics for people who aren't economists.

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Finding the ‘Art’ in Historical Fiction and Narrative History

Christopher Bram's sincere love for historical storytelling is contagious.

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European Fine Art Meets Japanese Manga in ‘Guardians of the Louvre’

Jiro Taniguchi's installment proves that contemporary manga artists can hold their own against the greatest in the pantheon of western art.

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Thomas Hauser’s ‘Muhammad Ali: A Tribute to the Greatest’ Is But Another Chapter

Ali's foremost biographer writes a coda to the champ's life -- but it shouldn't be the final word.

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Ruth Ozeki on Making Peace With the Mirror

What did her face look like before her parents were born? Ruth Ozeki decided to find out.

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Indie Horror Month 2016: Diving into 'Reveal the Deep'

// Moving Pixels

"In Reveal the Deep, the light only makes you more aware of the darkness

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