Reviews > Comics
Just Flying Through: ‘Generations: Iron Man and Ironheart #1’

A chance for Riri (Ironheart) Williams to expand her appeal fails to take off.

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Rising, Falling, and Rebuilding In Marvel’s ‘Secret Empire #10’

Secret Empire begins and ends with a struggle that warps, re-warps, and obscures reality to the utmost.

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‘The Legion of Regrettable Supervillains’ Is a Read You Won’t Regret

For a book about the worst of comic book bad guys, The Legion of Regrettable Supervillains isn’t bad at all. In fact, it’s good fun.

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Hammering Hard With Worthy Themes in ‘Generations Unworthy Thor & The Mighty Thor #1’

The life of two worthy souls become entwined in an all-too familiar, but still worthy narrative.

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Junkies, Wannabe Artists, Criminals and Other Temporary Friends in ‘The Customer is Always Wrong’

Throughout all of Pond's graphic memoir/confessional, her funny, biting, and overall authentic voice is brought to life with her expressive ink and watercolor panels.

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Legacy, Family, and Ninjas in ‘Marvel Generations: Wolverine & All-New Wolverine #1’

This comic is worth its weight in dead undead ninjas.

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‘The Many Lives of Catwoman’ Captures the Many Influences of This Multifaceted Superhero

Author and comic book historian Tim Hanley explores the far more than nine lives of DC’s Catwoman in this thoroughly in-depth biography/cultural contextualization.

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The Wordless Protagonist of ‘Leaf’ Doesn’t Save the World—Just Improves It

The absence of life-or-death consequences in Daishu Ma's debut graphic novel lowers the stakes while raising the novel’s quiet complexity.

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Rising Ashes From Two Eras: ‘Marvel Generations: Phoenix & Jean Grey #1’

Two stories, one character, and a shared fate converge in a moment of cosmic drama.

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It’s Anger Across The Ages in ‘Marvel Generations: Banner Hulk & Totally Awesome Hulk #1’

Two Hulks from two eras, Bruce Banner and Amadeus Cho, do a lot of smashing but leave surprisingly little impact.

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On Lynda Barry’s Exercise in Autobiofictionalography, ‘One! Hundred! Demons!’

“Is it autobiography if parts of it are not true? Is it fiction if parts of it are?”

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Dave Chisholm’s Wildly Imaginative Audio/visual Experience, ‘Instrumental’

An allegorical exploration of the idea of just how far some musicians will go to “make it”, Instrumental takes things to the extreme.

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Plots, Premonitions, and Pitfalls for an Empire in ‘Secret Empire #7’

The cracks in Hydra's empire widen as drama and losses escalate.

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The Top Tier X-men Assemble for a Top Level Blockbuster in ‘Astonishing X-men #1’

Astonishing X-men may be the most important X-men comic to come along since Secret Wars.

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‘Threads’ Is a Cartoon Sojourn in a Metaphorical Jungle of Real-world Refugees

A comics journalist interprets the plight of would-be immigrants trapped in French refugee camps just miles from their UK destination.

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The Premise of ‘Imagine Wanting Only This’ Is Artful In a Way More Typical of Fiction

A paradoxically impersonal memoir of not-quite coming-of-age in an age of isolation.

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‘Sand + Bone’ Confronts What War Does to a Man

Sand + Bone doesn't take a position so much as it illustrates a problem.

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Convergence of Character and Chaos In Marvel’s ‘Dr. Aphra #9’

Dr. Aphra continues to carve her own place in a galaxy far, far away.

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‘Star Wars #33’ Has Luke and Leia Stranded on a Watery Planet

This comic is basically the sci-fi equivalent of Cast Away, but with more sea monsters and fewer volleyballs.

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‘The Abominable Mr. Seabrook’ Explores a Life Lived From Inside a Bottle

Fleshing out the man behind the term ‘zombie’ and questionable claims of cannibalism, cartoonist Joe Ollmann presents a holistic look at the fascinating, though largely forgotten, life of William Seabrook.

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NYFF 2017: 'Mudbound'

// Notes from the Road

"Dee Rees’ churning and melodramatic epic follows two families in 1940s Mississippi, one black and one white, and the wars they fight abroad and at home.

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