Reviews > Comics
‘Wonder Woman #25’: From Rebirth to Resolve

Greg Rucka completes Wonder Woman's rebirth journey with heart, compassion, and wonder.

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What Can Women do? Pretty Much Anything: ‘Wonder Women’

"We have to get the stories of these women out into the world. Because representation matters."

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‘Condo Heartbreak Disco’: A Superhero Parody Set in an Absurdist World

A gender-bending anti-superhero chooses not to save the day.

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Crushing Adamantium Claws and Other ‘Weapons of Mutant Destruction #1’

The concept of living weapons in the Marvel Universe will make anyone who has ever had to clean up blood stains roll their eyes.

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‘Imagine Wanting Only This’ Is as Beautiful as It Is Troubling in the Questions it Poses

Through her visually stunning graphic memoir, Kristen Radtke explores themes of love and loss and the impermanence of life in all its forms.

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United, Divided, and Spited: Marvel’s ‘Secret Empire United #1’

The real world and the world of Secret Empire intersect to create a relevant, yet compelling story.

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‘Was She Pretty?’ Depicts a Litany of Ex-lovers

Was She Pretty? may suggest that anxieties over exes are universal, it also subtlety critiques its circle of privileged sufferers.

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Dressing Like Dolls as a Form of Resistance: ‘So Pretty / Very Rotten’

Unlike the western understanding of the word, "Lolitas" engage in a somewhat sexless performance of innocence, fairy tale femininity, and cultural resistance.

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Iceman May Be Out as a Gay Character, But He’s Not Quite Out With the World at Large

His parents don't accept him. The world, as a whole, doesn't accept him. Even other mutants seem more "normal" by comparison.

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Thi Bui Asks Readers to Reconsider Their Assumptions About the Vietnam War

Bui’s powers as a documentarian and oral historian make The Best We Could Do a thought-provoking take on Vietnam and immigrant experiences in general.

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‘Cable #1’ Brings on a Time Traveler Who Won’t Make You Roll Your Eyes

Part Terminator, part Marty McFly, and part Rocky Balboa, Cable sticks to the basics, but not much else.

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‘Boundless’ Captures the Alienating Effects of Media Consumption

Explorations of consumer alienation by an emerging master of graphic storytelling.

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Clawing (and Struggling) for Relevancy in ‘X-men Blue #4’

Everything Jimmy Hudson does just makes Wolverine fans miss Logan.

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The Journey to Paul Gauguin’s Other World Is Well Worth Taking

Graphic novel Gauguin: The Other World traverses the tropical landscapes and surreal mindscape of self-titled “savage” artist Paul Gauguin.

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‘Generation X #1’: A (Familiar) Youth Revival

Christina Strain and Amilcar Pinna bring the X-men's young guns back into the mix with a fresh foundation devoid of sterilization or extinction.

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The X-men’s Jean Grey Finally Gets a Chance to Forge Her Own Path

Despite all her overwhelming burdens, Jean Grey is all too human when it comes to matters of life, death, rebirth, and evil clones.

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The Creators of ‘Secret Empire #1’ Take a Huge Risk With This Issue

Hydra may be fascist, but those who buy into it gain a level of security and certainty that doesn't require mind control to appreciate.

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A Spoked-wheel View of America by an Award-winning Comics Artist

Eleanor Davis documents her up-hill struggle with America and her weak-kneed self in 'You & a Bike & a Road.

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Can an Illustrator Capture One Man’s Descent into a Void?

Imagine sitting, chained in place, watching the light from a window move across the wall. Guy Delisle imagines and renders it in Hostage.

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Progress Through Enlightenment, Progress Through Force: ‘Infamous Iron Man #7’

While stories about heroes becoming villains are nothing new, a character like Victor Von Doom requires a certain level of refinement.

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NYFF 2017: 'Mudbound'

// Notes from the Road

"Dee Rees’ churning and melodramatic epic follows two families in 1940s Mississippi, one black and one white, and the wars they fight abroad and at home.

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