Reviews > Comics
Truth in Beauty and Beauty in Truth: Graphic Memoir ‘Diario de Oaxaca’

Peter Kuper’s work reminds us of the vibrant and inspired everyday people who live under the tyranny of petty and corrupt officials in both Mexico and the United States.

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Shaping a Sibling Rivalry in ‘All-New Wolverine #25’

Laura and Daken deal with a new threat that requires strengthening a strained sibling relationship.

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Jiro Taniguchi’s ‘Furari’ Will Enchant You

The maximalist minimalism of Jiro Taniguchi's work is on full display in this gentle, rewarding work.

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‘Toward a Hot Jew’ Is No Joe Sacco — And That’s a Good Thing

Politics and the personal collide in the convention-challenging and genre-bending graphic narratives of Jewish artist-memoirist Miriam Libicki.

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Comics Scholarship Finds Its Voice With ‘INKS’ and ‘Drawing the Line’

From Ohio State (a hotbed for comics studies) comes INKS and Drawing the Line, books for both academics and fans of comics alike.

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The Joke’s on Batman in ‘Batman: White Knight #1’

This story doesn't just tweak the winning formula that has made Batman so successful over the past 70 years. It turns it on its head, inside out, and everything in between.

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Aquaman, Blooperman, Plastic Man, Bee-Man, Fatman: ‘Hero-A-Go-Go’!

Former DC editor Michael Eury offers up a loving look at the age of high cultural camp in comics and more in this collection of campy curios.

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Life “Between and Betwixt Two Worlds”: Diary of a Reluctant Dreamer

With both humor and pathos, Alberto Ledesma’s graphic novel/memoir provides an inside look at the life of an undocumented immigrant.

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Exploring Sacred Space with Jesse Jacob’s ‘Crawl Space’

Evocative of Edwin Abbott’s Flatland, Jacobs takes on environmental destruction, the desecration of the sacred, and the arrogance and selfishness that plague our politics and our world.

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‘Language Barrier’ Illustrates That Words Are Pictures Too

This surreal exploration of the peculiar boundary between words and pictures dives directly into the deep end of the image-text pool.

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On the Ambitious, World-building Narrative of ‘Marvel Legacy #1’

At a time when all things related to fascism inspire Hulk-level outrage, the current legacy of Marvel is in a tenuous position.

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On Memory and Nostalgia: Seth’s ‘Palookaville 23’

A wonderful addition to Seth’s already brilliant body of work, Palookaville 23 is a reminder of how much time he’s dedicated to his art, and how worthwhile that time has been.

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Idols, Ideals, and Reminders in ‘Generations: Captain Marvel & Ms. Marvel #1’

Ms. Marvel reconnects with her idol, but a choppy narrative limits the impact.

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Jack Kirby’s Influence Is Felt on Nearly Every Page of ‘Marvel Year By Year’

All of the important in-continuity events are here: the death of Gwen Stacy, the Kree-Skull War, the death of Jean Grey, Civil War.

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Titles, Legacies, and Basics in ‘Generations: Captain Marvel & Captain Mar-Vell #1’

Carol Danvers gets back to basics on what it means to be Captain Marvel.

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‘I’m Not Here’ Is One of the Richest and Gently Disturbing Graphic Novels I’ve Read in Years

We travel with the protagonist, suffering the same confusions that define her life.

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A Bullied Nature Nerd Falls Victim to His Own Deep-rooted Revenge in ‘Outburst’

Coudyzer's visual narration suggests that even though many children can be inhuman in their cruelty, even the worst eventually grow into human beings.

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Just Flying Through: ‘Generations: Iron Man and Ironheart #1’

A chance for Riri (Ironheart) Williams to expand her appeal fails to take off.

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Rising, Falling, and Rebuilding In Marvel’s ‘Secret Empire #10’

Secret Empire begins and ends with a struggle that warps, re-warps, and obscures reality to the utmost.

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‘The Legion of Regrettable Supervillains’ Is a Read You Won’t Regret

For a book about the worst of comic book bad guys, The Legion of Regrettable Supervillains isn’t bad at all. In fact, it’s good fun.

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NYFF 2017: 'Mudbound'

// Notes from the Road

"Dee Rees’ churning and melodramatic epic follows two families in 1940s Mississippi, one black and one white, and the wars they fight abroad and at home.

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