Reviews > Film
The Essential Dilemma in ‘Under the Sun’ Is That No Truth Is singular, No Story Is Simple

The documentary tells a story of North Korean oppression by focusing on eight-year-old Zin-mi, her openness and also her caution, her obvious effort to please and her occasional and barely discernible frustration.

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‘Bad Moms’ Embraces the Stereotypes It so Desperately Wants to Subvert

The story is uneven, the laughs are plentiful, but it's the politics that make this movie a tad... questionable.

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Just How Would Captain Fantastic Feel About His Own Film?

An average day at Ben Cash's commune -- at least in his mind -- would make Iron Man competitions look like intermediate intramural fluff.

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‘The Secret Life of Pets’ Indicates Filmwriters Are Worn Out

The Secret Life of Pets is what happens when filmmakers try to create a movie around an entertaining teaser -- you get a main course that makes you long for the appetizer.

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‘Jason Bourne’: The Bourne Repetition

Here again, the cuts in fight scenes are thrilling but maybe indecipherable, making irrelevant any logic of time and space, in favor of a viewing experience you might call meta-visceral.

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Who’s Watching the Watchers in ‘Nerve’?

Nerve indicts the bad social media consumers, but lets you, the "better watchers", off the hook.

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Mollner’s ‘Outlaws and Angels’ Trying Western Isn’t for the Weak of Heart

Mollner lays out this harsh story and rubs our faces in it. It's raw and hurtful and the sting remains even after the last frame has faded from our retinas.

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Fantasia Film Festival 2016: ‘Slash’ + ‘The Love Witch’

At this year's Fantasia Film Festival, you'll see all kinds of films, including one stylized homage to the sexual revolution and one playful nod to sexual repression.

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‘Kabali’ Is a Cerebral Gangster Film

Kabali, Rajinikanth's finest film in years, asks (and answers) whether the lumpenproletariat can be revolutionary.

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‘Café Society’ Is an Exhausting, Exasperating Film About Illusions and Delusions

The Woody Allen express rolls bumpily on with a glossy '30s-set bauble that half-heartedly poses the same interesting questions he’s been ruminating on for decades.

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Woody Allen Can’t Be Anyone But Himself in ‘Café Society’

Café Society is a competent film, but that's hardly praise for an auteur director like Woody Allen.

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By Looking Backward, ‘Star Trek Beyond’ Prepares the Franchise for the Future

Star Trek Beyond successfully straddles the fine line between Star Wars' high tech toy merchandising and the serious ideas fostered by concept creator, Gene Roddenberry. It's also a stone cold blast.

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‘Richard III’ Is Ian McKellen’s Glorious Rendition of an Absolute Villain

With Shakespeare's A Game of Thrones rendered into a Fascist version of '30s Britain, be careful whose side you're on.

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‘Ghostbusters’ Pays Homage to the Original, But Fails to Forge Its Own Identity

Like Jurassic World and Star Wars: The Force Awakens before it, Ghostbusters relies on a familiar formula to ensure the safest product possible.

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‘Everybody Wants Some!!’ Is a Crash Course of Self-discovery and Independence

Richard Linklater's spiritual sequel to Dazed and Confused hits the '80s with a little education and a lot of partying: self-discovery lies somewhere between.

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‘Zero Days’ Makes Clear: Innovation in Warfare Is Governed by Short-sightedness

The US, so brilliantly networked, so technologically advanced, is "the most vulnerable nation on earth".

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‘Mike and Dave Need Wedding Dates’ Abandons Comedy at the Altar

A collection of stupid people doing stupid things that even the stupidest person wouldn’t do.

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Robert Altman’s ‘The Player’ Is Art—Now More than Ever

Robert Altman's multi-layered sarcastic skewering of Hollywood culture still has to be seen to be believed, from the first moment to the last.

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Like Its Titular Character, ‘The Phenom’ Is an Uneven Film, But Holds Promise

The Phenom is at once remarkable for both its transfixing cinematography and Johnny Simmons's tightly coiled performance, but it's mired by its over reliance on exposition.

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Strained Sweetness Leads to a Bitter Feeling in ‘No Stranger Than Love’

Obsessing over gross small town stereotypes, facile symbolism, and mawkish philosophical exposition, this is an uneven mess, and misses opportunities.

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Bad Graphics Are Still Impressive in ‘Spirits of Xanadu’

// Moving Pixels

"Spirits of Xanadu wrings emotion and style out of its low fidelity graphics.

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