Reviews > Film
In ‘Bobbi Jene’, a Dancer’s Artistic Vision Is Rooted in Personal Sacrifice

While Bobbi Jene often veers too closely to melodrama, seeing an emboldened woman artistically express her sexuality and earn effusive praise for it is inspirational.

READ more
‘Kingsman: The Golden Circle’ Is Comically Bad

Matthew Vaughn’s hyper-kinetic spy comedy can’t decide if it’s a lighthearted spoof of the Bond films it obviously loves, or a smug and ironic takedown of espionage thrillers.

READ more
‘Band Aid’ Serves as a Plaster for What Ails the Jaded Movie Lover

This winning indie comedy-drama splits those two genres as neatly as an atom but gets the most energy out of the comedy side.

READ more
‘mother!’ Is Poignant and Powerful, and Not At All Pleasant

This is a grotesque, two-horned beast of a marital drama, a nightmarish vision of emotional abandonment and psychological abuse, all for the sake of art.

READ more
Aronofsky’s ‘mother!’ of All Head Trips

Bold, pretentious, and divisive, Darren Aronofsky’s psychological thriller is an exhilarating (and exhausting) cinematic experience.

READ more

14 Sep 2017 // 10:00 AM

TIFF 2017: mother!

While Aronofsky’s artistry is at an all-time-low, it's his misogyny that makes this film abhorrent.

READ more
‘All Eyez On Me’ Suffers From Near-sighted Hero-worship

This long-awaited biopic focuses too much on the minutiae and too little on Tupac Shakur's riveting life.

READ more
TIFF 2017: ‘Faces Places’ (Visages Villages)

Agnès Varda's usual cinematic beauty and charm come through, with her subjective experience creating a wonderfully delightful film about art.

READ more
On Passing Gas and the Time in Yasujiro Ozu’s ‘Good Morning’

Ozu’s Good Morning demonstrates that platitudes such as “hello” and “good morning” are not merely pleasantries, they are acts of reconnaissance.

READ more
TIFF 2017: Le Redoutable

Blinded by love for Godard, Le Redoutable is an uncritically sexist bore.

READ more
Bresson and Ray on Money and Its Corruptions in ‘They Live by Night’ and ‘L’argent’

Nicholas Ray's debut and Robert Bresson's farewell to cinema may be split by decades and operate in different genres, but they come together in examining the fatalistic implications of money changing hands.

READ more
The Realpolitik of Wildlife Conservation is Explored in Documentary, ‘Trophy’

Trophy pits emotionally unsettling images against a sophisticated blend of practical justifications which compel a more mature outlook on the correlation between big game hunting and wildlife conservationism.

READ more
‘The Teacher’ Shows That Communism’s Impact Still Resonates

Director Jan Hrebejk uses a Bratislavan high school to explore abuse of power and the effects of group complacency endemic to the time.

READ more
Stephen King Adaptation ‘It’ Hurts

Director Andy Muschietti’s adaptation of Stephen King’s horror classic is a hodgepodge of tones and genres that begs the question, “Who is the audience for this movie?”

READ more
Bond on Valium? This Game of ‘Hopscotch’ Is a Low-key but Entertaining Affair

A slow first act can't keep Walter Matthau from soaring as an opera-loving agent with no more license to kill.

READ more
Sleazy ‘Good Time’ Takes You to the More Squalid Precincts of the Human Spirit

This riveting crime thriller from the Safdie Brothers is like the slimy friend that knows all the best dives.

READ more
Chantal Akerman’s ‘Jeanne Dielman’ in Many Ways Strikes One As a Vermeer Painting Come to Life

This remarkable film shares many qualities with Vermeer’s paintings of domestic interiors in its obsession with frontality and its exquisite concern with the rich textures of Interior space.

READ more
‘Logan Lucky’ Is an Oftentimes Funny Mishmash of Absurdism and Realism

Filled with colorful characters and playful plot twists, this hillbilly heist proves that Steven Soderbergh still loves a good con game.

READ more
A Nice Guy in Noirland Reaches ‘The Breaking Point’

This 1950 adaptation of Ernest Hemingway's To Have and Have Not features John Garfield and director Michael Curtiz at their best.

READ more
Sacha Guitry’s ‘La Poison’ Is a Small, Sour Masterpiece of Provincial Satire

This is a very dark and sardonic explosion of all the polite conventions that grease society -- and other movies.

READ more
More Recent Reviews
//Mixed media

//Blogs

"No Dollars in Duende": On Making Uncompromising, Spirited Music

// Sound Affects

"On the elusive yet clearly existential sadness that adds layers and textures to music.

READ the article