Reviews > Film
‘In Pursuit of Silence’ Challenges the Senses

In Pursuit of Silence's technical mastery overcomes its overuse of interview commentary to illustrate silence's numerous edifying properties.

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Award-winning Cinematography Enriches François Ozon’s ‘Frantz’

Impressive camerawork draws viewers close to characters whose lives have been turned upside down by World War I.

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‘Maudie’ Explores How Art Can Come From the Most Unlikely Places

Sally Hawkins lifts her complex role with a graceful energy, helped by Maudie's visual approach, which is sometimes delicately impressionistic and sometimes more artisanal.

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‘Lindy Lou, Juror Number 2’ Humanizes the American Juror As More Than Just Another Digit

Lindy’s conversations  with fellow former jurors reveal some understated nuances in American politics and culture better than mere argumentation ever can.

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‘The Book of Henry’ Goes From Tearjerker to Just Plain Jerky

It’s difficult to recall a film soaring so high, only to crash beneath the weight of its own narrative and thematic blunders.

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‘The Jacques Rivette Collection’: Three Proto-Lynchian Dream Teases

Rivette's Duelle, Noroît and Merry-Go-Round are the kind of films that are always on the verge of almost making sense.

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Brash and Playful ‘Okja’ is the Summer’s Activist Epic

Bong Joon Ho’s uneven but still electrifying caper about a little girl and her giant pig on the run from villainous Tilda Swinton swirls a sharp dose of slapstick comedy into its pop satirical narrative.

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In ‘The Blood is at the Doorstep’, a Family Suffers From an Intransigent Criminal Justice System

Erik Ljung's work is an auspicious cinematic debut which reminds that for every criminal justice statistic, there's a stirring story which deserves to be deeply considered.

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Resistance and Hope in ‘Letter to Brezhnev’

Opportunities for happiness and betterment may be few and far between, but these Liverpudlians will grab them when they do come their way.

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Linklater’s “Before” Trilogy Is About So Much More Than Romantic Love

Across three films and 18 years, the characters of Jesse and Céline have endured in the hearts of cinephiles everywhere, but their journey remains more complex than you remembered.

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‘Megan Leavey’: The Story of a Dog and His Girl

Megan Leavey is not interested in the Iraq war as such. What it offers instead is the story of her journey, heartfelt and well-acted, but never surprising.

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Human Rights Watch Film Festival 2017: ‘Nowhere to Hide’

Zaradasht Ahmed's opening night film is a quiet but searing portrait of an Iraqi family hurled into exile by the chaos that followed the 2011 pullout of American forces.

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’The Mummy (2017)’ Abandons Campy Fun for Faux Gravitas

Alex Kurtzman’s first chapter in the ‘Dark Universe’ franchise is stuck somewhere between William Castle and William Shakespeare.

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Jacques Demy’s ‘The Young Girls of Rochefort’ Is Awash With Color—and Influence

How much did La La Land draw from the distinctive look, music, and atmosphere of this 1967 French classic?

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‘Berlin Syndrome’ and the Struggle of Civilising the Antisocial

Director Cate Shortland assuredly rides along on her protagonist's raw desperation, crafting a nightmarish and visceral experience off-centre of mainstream filmmaking.

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Making Their Mark in Early Film: An Excellent Anthology of Women Directors

First they survived an unpredictable male-dominated industry, and then their films survived the passage of time. Early Women Filmmakers: An International Anthology.

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The Tense Tale of ‘Black Butterfly’ Almost Twists Itself Apart

Imagination and violence collide in this story within a story.

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‘Paterson’ and the Role of the Silent Artist

Paterson uses poetry as an outlet of expression that can be pursued in the confines of his small boat upon the ocean.

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“You’ve Come a Long Way, Baby”: Patronizing Feminism in ‘Woman of the Year’

Woman of the Year suggests that a woman’s public success is predicated on her lack of femininity.

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Cannes 2017: Recognizing Unjust Official Authority in ‘Lerd’ and ‘Tesnota’

The Un Certain Regard program presents films more diverse in aesthetics and geography than the main competition at Cannes. Lerd and Tesnota show why those criteria for selection are rewarding.

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The Thoughtful Absurdity of 'Spaceplan'

// Moving Pixels

"Spaceplan is a goofy game that still manages to pack a potent emotional punch.

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