Reviews > Film
‘Prime Cut’ Is Proof That the ‘70s Is American Cinema’s Greatest Decade

Like many great American films of the '70s, Prime Cut tackles major social issues through the lens of realism.

READ more
‘While We’re Young’ Satirically Skews Gen Xers and Millennial Hipsters

While We’re Young is less about "acting your age" and more about embracing your authentic self.

READ more
‘Max’ Abides by the “More Is More” Mantra

In Max, more is more: more emotional crises, more stereotypes, more action are all spun as if by a centrifuge of formula then spewed onto a big summer screen.

READ more
‘Ted 2’ Is Smarter and Smuttier Than Your Average Bear

Ted 2 is uproariously funny, with just enough sprinkling of social satire to stretch this already thin premise into a satisfying sequel.

READ more
‘A Little Chaos’ Is Too Orderly

The few proto-feminist inklings in Alan Rickman's A Little Chaos wither away by the end, trading in chaos for the usual order.

READ more
‘The Bridge’ Shows a Forgotten Side of Nazi Germany’s Final Days

The Bridge, which tells the story of the Volkssturm in the final days of the Nazi party, is classic work of art.

READ more
‘Dope’ and the Adventures of Nerds in the Hood

The kitchen-sink plotting of Rick Famuyiwa’s antic retro-nerd teen comedy borders on the desperate, but its brash, can’t-box-me-in spirit wins out in the end.

READ more
‘God Help the Girl’ Is a Belle and Sebastian Jukebox in Movie Form

With its mix of silliness and seriousness, and music and melodrama, God Help the Girl is top-to-bottom charming.

READ more
AFI Docs 2015: ‘The Storm Makers’

Set in Southeast Asia, The Storm Makers underscores how war and genocide produce layers of legacy through the experience of a woman who was a victim of sex trafficking.

READ more
‘The Escapees’ Is Equally Preposterous and Poetic

At turns poignant and silly, The Escapees is a lesser picture by Jean Rollin, one devoid of his fanciful surrealism.

READ more
AFI Docs 2015 + HBO: ‘Requiem for the Dead: American Spring 2014’

As Requiem for the Dead shows, the clues that signal the violence committed by gun-bearing killers found on social media are missed until it's too late.

READ more
‘Bank Shot’, ‘Cops and Robbers’, and ‘Harry in Your Pocket’ Capture the Evolution of Heist Films

Starting in the '70s, heist and caper films evolved from the high-society champagne crime of the '30s and '40s to gritty, realistic robbery pictures.

READ more
‘Madame Bovary’ Infantilizes Gustave Flaubert’s Protagonist

We are left feeling about Madame Bovary much as Emma Bovary feels about her life: disappointed.

READ more
Human Rights Watch Film Festival 2015: ‘(T)Error’

As compelling as (T)Error's restless images are, the film never lets you forget what you can't see, what's deliberately hidden, and what's receding from view even as you look.

READ more
‘Hammer’ Introduces One of Blaxploitation’s Most Popular Figures

Significant for its launch of Fred Williamson's career, Hammer is a typical entry into the blaxploitation fold, a cauldron of genre tropes that never really reaches a boiling point.

READ more
AFI Docs 2015: ‘Drone’ Shows How the World Is Becoming a War Zone

Drone raises vital questions not only about how drones shapes the modern military experiences, but also about how drones reshape moral ground.

READ more
‘Inside Out’ Finds Disney and Pixar Working Together Successfully

Although it sends reductive messages about the emotions of young girls, Inside Out is of the kind of brilliance that Pixar used to churn out regularly, before it was bought out by Disney.

READ more
Human Rights Watch Festival and AFI Docs 2015: ‘Of Men and War’

Of Men and War, shot over six years, follows multiple mostly unnamed veterans as they share their rage, fear, and frustration.

READ more
Sexism Just Won’t Die in ‘Burying the Ex’

Playing like a "Rom-Zom-Com" helmed by Judd Apatow, Burying the Ex suffers from a repository of sexist tropes, a somewhat redeeming ending notwithstanding.

READ more
‘Odd Man Out’ and ‘The Lady From Shanghai’ Set the Stage for Carol Reed’s ‘The Third Man’

These two movies can be seen as cinematic cousins of Carol Reed's The Third Man, sharing some lineage while nonetheless carving out their own idiosyncratic identities.

READ more
More Recent Reviews
//Mixed media
//Blogs

Ubisoft Understands the Art of the Climb

// Moving Pixels

"Ubisoft's Assassin's Creed and Grow Home epitomize the art of the climb.

READ the article