Call for Essays About Any Aspect of Popular Culture, Present or Past

Reviews > Film

Sunday, January 1 1995

The Perfect Storm (2000)

M00o93H7pQ09L8X1t49cHY01Z5j4TT91fGfr


Quills (2000)

If we believe all that Philip Kaufman's 'Quills' has to tell us about the man, Sade is much more than a randy aristocrat -- he is a champion of free speech and artistic integrity.


On the Line (2001)

In On the Line, Kev (Lance Bass) is bland as can be, an unfortunate condition for a romantic lead.


The Original Kings of Comedy (2000)

M30o93H7pQ09L8X1t49cHY01Z5j4TT91fGfr


Our Lady of the Assassins (2001)

Initially a rather deft and timely exploration of the human consequences of the politics and business of drugs, by the end, 'Our Lady of the Assassins' is content merely to linger on the spectacle and eroticization of casual violence.


Orphans (1997/2000)

In the Glasgow, Scotland harbor, on a cloudy windy morning after a storm, a man's bleeding body floats on a frail piece of wood. For all its artsy beauty, this poster image for Orphans, the writing and directing debut of actor Peter Mullan, is misleading, for it depicts perhaps the only serene moment in the film, one that interrupts the stabbing, shooting, screaming, inclement weather, and other calamities that rage on as four grown-up siblings mourn their mother's early death.


O Brother, Where Art Thou? (2000)

It's a Depression-era musical laid on top of a chain gang escape film, inspired at once by Homer's 'The Odyssey' and Preston Sturges' screwball comedies. But outrageous as it might seem, this ultra-high-concept project suffers from a lack of inspiration.


O (2001)

This is easily O's most cogent insight, which it hits hard and insistently -- the ways that longstanding cultural anxieties about race in the U.S. continue to affect young people's individual and community relationships, just as it affects adults.


Original Sin (2001)

... expensive, tacky melodrama.


One Night at McCool’s (2001)

Any movie that offers proud big bully Andrew Dice Clay as a walking joke, however self-knowing or smug, is starting at a disadvantage. Andrew Dice Clay already made that joke himself, you know, and more than a few years ago.


Osmosis Jones (2001)

Who would have guessed it? Living inside inveterate white guy Frank (Bill Murray) is a company of black folks.


One Day in September (1999)

By tracing these failures, 'One Day in September' represents compelling links between sports (in general and specifically Olympian) and violence, as a basis for cultural exchange.


Outside Providence (1999)

Outside Providence begins in a lackluster manner, situating itself in Pawtucket, Rhode Island, in 1974. Tim Dunphy (Shawn Hatosy) just wants to party, but his overbearing, emotionally secretive father, (Alec Baldwin), is not quite hip to the idea of teenage insolence. The generation gap becomes more of a pit, when Tim manages to rear end a parked police car. A slap to the face is the result, as well as a trip to the Cornwall Prep School for Boys. Bummer.


The Others (2001)

Written, directed, and scored by the young Spanish filmmaker Alejandro Amenabar, 'The Others' explores the evolving relationship between Grace and the servants, especially Mrs. Mills, as this mirrors Grace's changing perception of herself, in the world.


Nico and Dani (2001)

'Nico and Dani' is probably what 'Dawson's Creek' would be if it was directed by Almodovar.


Novocaine (2001)

Novocaine's biggest concern seems to be with the act of lying, and Frank is far from the only guilty party.


The Ninth Gate (1999)

Roman Polanski and Johnny Depp. The match seems made in heaven, these two notoriously eccentric, fascinating, and difficult geniuses, plying their crafts, inspiring brilliance in one another.


Nurse Betty (2000)

It's revealing that Wesley (Chris Rock) remains locked in an ignoble self-image born of gangster and 'hood movies: eager to emulate and please his mentor, he explains his flamboyant violence by saying, 'I'm just trying to make a statement.'"


Nutty Professor II: The Klumps (2000)

From start to finish, the film is suffused with Eddie Murphyness, his elevated sense of himself and his desire to do 'what no one else has done before.'"


Notting Hill (1999)

'The fame thing,' says fictional megawatt movie star Anna Scott, 'isn't really real.' And she should know, since she's played by real-life megawatt movie star Julia Roberts. The fame thing often does seem unreal to people who don't live it, so it's comforting to hear from Anna (or Julia) that it seems unreal to her as well


Now on PopMatters
Announcements
PM Picks

© 1999-2014 PopMatters.com. All rights reserved.
PopMatters.com™ and PopMatters™ are trademarks
of PopMatters Media, Inc.

PopMatters is wholly independently owned and operated.