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Sunday, January 1 1995

Flawless (1999)

These are the first of many derogatory adjectives that come to my mind when trying to describe writer-director Joel Schumacher's new film, Flawless, which stars Robert DeNiro and Philip Seymour Hoffman (the latter being one of my favorite character actors, who has, sadly, two recent misses with Flawless and The Talented Mr. Ripley).


The Five Senses (1999)

It's about the ways that your senses are deluded and depressed by daily emotional beat-downs, the kinds of events that are so routine, they hardly register, except by their long-term effects.


Fat Girl (2001)

The sex in 'Fat Girl' is an all-consuming, character-defining process of sorting through emotions and attitudes that convincingly perplexes these girls.


The Family Man (2000)

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The Fantasticks (2000)

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The Fast and the Furious (2001)

But the movie isn't really about breaking laws, being punished, lamenting Ja Rule's teeny part, or even learning how to be a man. It's really about cars. If that sounds like a metaphor, well, okay.


The Forsaken (2001)

What makes a vampire movie sexy? For most people I have talked with, it is the subtle sexuality in the biting of the neck, the mysterious nature of the vampire, and the danger he or she represents.


Freddy Got Fingered (2001)

'Freddy Got Fingered' lowers the bar, and not just a little bit, for what has been popularly passing as 'comedy' in recent days.


Finding Forrester (2000)

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East Is East (1999)

As East is East has it, family is the cause of, and solution to, the various problems facing the Khan children.


Everybody’s Famous! (2001)

...offers a cautionary tale for those for whom the distinction between life and live television has lost focus.


An Everlasting Piece (2000)

Just in case there is an audience member who hasn't seen the news since, like, 1970, the film uses this conversation and some supposedly comic comparisons between the Catholic and Protestant neighborhoods to illustrate Colm's inferior position in society (and by extension, the position of Belfast's Catholics generally).


Eureka (2001)

Harshly beautiful, 'Eureka' is also contrary and strange: intertwining subjects as sensational as serial killing and as mundane as life on the road in a Winnebago, it never quite takes you where you think it will. "


Exit Wounds (2001)

The first scene in 'Exit Wounds' shows Boyd (Steven Seagal) arriving to a speech on handgun control given by the Vice President. He arrives late to the speech, cueing the audience -- and his superiors -- to his renegade spirit.


Eye of the Beholder (2000)

Wigs. Ideally, they can change everything: your appearance, your self-image, your imagined possibilities, your identity. In the movies, wigs can also effect change, but at the same time, they carry moral meanings, they can suggest artifice and disguise, dashed dreams and pathologies.


The Emperor’s New Groove (2000)

There are a lot of things to like about 'The Emperor's New Groove', and one of the most compelling is the fact that the lead character, the teenaged Emperor Kuzco (voiced by David Spade) is largely unlikable.


End of Days (1999)

Hollywood's most recent millennial offering is End of Days, the latest in a long line of apocalyptic visions that have seen the planet threatened by the likes of aliens, asteroids, tidal waves, even bats.


Evolution (2001)

It feels like a chain industry has bought up a neighborhood institution. It's inevitable, but it is also, like the mall that looms so prominently in Evolution's imaginative realm, routine and uninspired.


Enemy at the Gates (2001)

This is Enemy at the Gates's most elegant theme, one that its often heavy-handed melodrama almost but not quite diminishes: that to be observed is to die, but to be invisible and quiet as the dead may allow you to survive.


8 1/2 Women (1999)

For all their superficial differences, the women are actually surprisingly homogenous, in attitude as well as their intellectual and emotional void, and in their collective role as the 'exotic other.'"


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