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Sunday, January 1 1995

The Big Tease (2000)

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Battlefield Earth (2000)

As one of four producers for the film, Travolta helped to secure the $100 million independent financing, most of which seems to have gone into the Psychlos' elaborate dreadlocked wigs and the enormous platform boots that make the big meanies look eight feet tall and terribly slow on their feet.


Bread and Roses (2000)

Using a Mexican immigrant to talk about class in America, director Ken Loach explores the ways that race and ethnicity are intricately bound to questions of empowerment and wealth.


The Broken Hearts Club (2000)

In comparison to this club's bunch of self-involved twentysomethings [in 'The Broken Hearts Club'], Dawson and his pals on the 'Creek' are living on the edge.


Bamboozled (2000)

Messy, outrageous, and mostly brilliant, 'Bamboozled' is bound to make trouble. And I can't think of a more important trouble to make.


Boiler Room (2000)

You might love a film about unspeakably wealthy whiteboy stock traders that opens by quoting Biggie Smalls. Then again, you might hate it. The citation is surely reverent, but it also reveals a certain confusion concerning early Biggie rhymes, and maybe hip-hop in general.


Bridget Jones’s Diary (2001)

In her diary, Bridget Jones is a star.


The Brothers (2001)

Facing his boys on the basketball court, where they go to sweat, score, and hash out their 'stuff', Terry (Shemar Moore) argues -- none too convincingly -- that his settling down is a sign of his maturity. The others are unconvinced. And so they go on to talk about it. A lot.


Beautiful (2000)

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The Body (2001)

... examines the threat science poses to organized religion.


Bootmen (2000)

In lieu of making a strong pro-labor statement, 'Bootmen' focuses on asserting that these dancers are not pansies.


Big Trouble in Little China (1986/2001)

Jack Burton (Kurt Russell) is the anti-hunk, the inverse of the pectorally endowed fighting machines typified by Stallone and Schwarzenegger.


A Beautiful Mind (2001)

A Beautiful Mind idealizes mental illness as spectacle, a feel-good gladiatorial games of the psyche where the human spirits always triumphs and love always blooms.


Bring It On (2000)

Now this is a surprise: Bring It On is, at some not-quite-invisible sublevel, about white thievery of black cultural forms and content.


Black Knight (2001)

PULL.


Blair Witch 2: Book of Shadows (2000)

As the Blair Witch has her way with the group one by one, 'BW2' turns partly cheesy and nonsensical like a slasher film and partly, like 'BW1', emotional and visceral, with disquieting depictions of grisly violence.


The Blair Witch Project (1999)

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Beyond the Mat (1999)

'Who are these guys?' a voice asks, as the screen is filled with successive images of men, some bloody and all wearing tights, beating one another senseless.


Boys Don’t Cry (1999)

As the charismatic protagonist in Kimberly Peirce's Boys Don't Cry, Brandon embodies the ongoing dilemma of masculine identity. This dilemma is exacerbated by the fact that, when you see him riding that pickup truck, some fifteen minutes into the film, you already know that 18-year-old Brandon's efforts to act like a boy are complicated by the fact that he is, biologically speaking, a girl, born Teena Brandon.


Butterfly (Lengua de las mariposas, La) (1999)

Jose Luis Cuerda's film, Butterfly, mourns the Spain destroyed by civil conflict by remembering it through the enchanted eyes of a small boy.


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