Reviews > Film
AFI Docs 2015: ‘The Storm Makers’

Set in Southeast Asia, The Storm Makers underscores how war and genocide produce layers of legacy through the experience of a woman who was a victim of sex trafficking.

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‘The Escapees’ Is Equally Preposterous and Poetic

At turns poignant and silly, The Escapees is a lesser picture by Jean Rollin, one devoid of his fanciful surrealism.

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AFI Docs 2015 + HBO: ‘Requiem for the Dead: American Spring 2014’

As Requiem for the Dead shows, the clues that signal the violence committed by gun-bearing killers found on social media are missed until it's too late.

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‘Bank Shot’, ‘Cops and Robbers’, and ‘Harry in Your Pocket’ Capture the Evolution of Heist Films

Starting in the '70s, heist and caper films evolved from the high-society champagne crime of the '30s and '40s to gritty, realistic robbery pictures.

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‘Madame Bovary’ Infantilizes Gustave Flaubert’s Protagonist

We are left feeling about Madame Bovary much as Emma Bovary feels about her life: disappointed.

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Human Rights Watch Film Festival 2015: ‘(T)Error’

As compelling as (T)Error's restless images are, the film never lets you forget what you can't see, what's deliberately hidden, and what's receding from view even as you look.

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‘Hammer’ Introduces One of Blaxploitation’s Most Popular Figures

Significant for its launch of Fred Williamson's career, Hammer is a typical entry into the blaxploitation fold, a cauldron of genre tropes that never really reaches a boiling point.

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AFI Docs 2015: ‘Drone’ Shows How the World Is Becoming a War Zone

Drone raises vital questions not only about how drones shapes the modern military experiences, but also about how drones reshape moral ground.

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‘Inside Out’ Finds Disney and Pixar Working Together Successfully

Although it sends reductive messages about the emotions of young girls, Inside Out is of the kind of brilliance that Pixar used to churn out regularly, before it was bought out by Disney.

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Human Rights Watch Festival and AFI Docs 2015: ‘Of Men and War’

Of Men and War, shot over six years, follows multiple mostly unnamed veterans as they share their rage, fear, and frustration.

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Sexism Just Won’t Die in ‘Burying the Ex’

Playing like a "Rom-Zom-Com" helmed by Judd Apatow, Burying the Ex suffers from a repository of sexist tropes, a somewhat redeeming ending notwithstanding.

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‘Odd Man Out’ and ‘The Lady From Shanghai’ Set the Stage for Carol Reed’s ‘The Third Man’

These two movies can be seen as cinematic cousins of Carol Reed's The Third Man, sharing some lineage while nonetheless carving out their own idiosyncratic identities.

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Every Timeline in ‘Project Almanac’ Is Plagued With Cliché

There's a kernel of an interesting, emotional idea at the core of Project Almanac, but it's hard to get invested in it due to the overwhelming familiarity of the plot.

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Two Jack Hill Flicks Are Resurrected in ‘Spider Baby’ and ‘Pit Stop’

Spider Baby and Pit Stop are two lost obscurities from the '60s that now look sharper than ever thanks to reissues from Arrow Films.

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Michael Mann Delves Into Digital Video With the Underwhelming ‘Blackhat’

Globe-trotting and often ridiculous, Blackhat plays like a dour, withholding installment of Mission: Impossible.

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Human Rights Watch Festival 2015: ‘This is My Land’ Documents Education in Palestine and Israel

In observing these many experiences of education in Palestine and Israel, This Is My Land doesn't connect them, or even offer explanations so much as it presents them for your contemplation.

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‘Me and Earl and the Dying Girl’ Serves as Another White Boy’s Life Lesson

Earl and Greg make their movies for each other. When they expand their audience, the framework for their jokes, their references, their bond, changes inalterably.

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‘Winter Sleep’ Is a Cinematic Essay on Emotional Collapse

Filmmaker Nuri Bilge Ceylan captures the haunted air of a quiet Turkish village in his Palme d'Or winning film.

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Human Rights Watch Film Festival 2015: ‘Cartel Land’ and the Never-Ending Story of the Drug War

Cartel Land reveals the false opposition between good and evil in the drug wars.

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12 Jun 2015 // 9:30 AM

‘Jurassic World’ Revists Monstrous Corporate Greed

For obvious reasons, Jurassic World can’t directly call out corporate titans, but it does in a subversive way. The dinosaurs aren't the only ones with claws, here.

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Guster + Kishi Bashi Perform at Central Park Summerstage (Photos)

// Notes from the Road

"Guster's Summerstage performance was a showcase of their infectious and poppy music from the last 24 years.

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