Reviews > Film
No One Is Looking for You in ‘10 Cloverfield Lane’

10 Cloverfield Lane carefully develops a very subjective story, which has you thinking that maybe the clichés aren’t adding up to the movie you thought it was.

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‘Eye in the Sky’ Shows There Is No Remove When Waging War From a Distance

For all the intelligence and firepower that such technology allows, drones also raise pressing questions, laid out in Eye in the Sky with a schematic and often unnerving precision.

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Terrence Malick’s Latest, ‘Knight of Cups’, Is Another Search for Meaning

Terrence Malick’s latest gauzy whisper of a drama has Christian Bale as a po-faced screenwriter grappling with an existential crisis while romancing most of Southern California.

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‘Me Him Her’ Is a Romantic Comedy With an Appealingly Soft Center

Me Him Her's insistently daft, self-involved representations of Los Angeles and those who live there include clichés played mostly for laughs.

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Bernard Rose’s ‘Frankenstein’ Is a Tale of the Postmodern Prometheus

The director of Candyman and Immortal Beloved brings us a present day retelling of Frankenstein that is both as flawed and forgivable as its main character.

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The Pros and Cons of M. Night Shyamalan’s ‘The Visit’

M. Night Shyamalan creates an engaging found footage film that helps you to care for the main characters and wish them the best throughout this suspenseful (if never terrifying) ordeal.

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Sleep Talking: ‘Sleep With Me’ and Love in Generation X

A small and quiet film, Sleep With Me speaks to a margin of people who understand the difficulties of redressing issues that have carried over from their younger lives.

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‘Whiskey Tango Foxtrot’ Is an American White Lady Story

Kim (Tina Fey) is representative of many Americans who judge the cultures America has invaded, and is unable to understand the damage caused.

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‘Flowers’ Weaves a Beautifully Melancholic Tale of Grief, Loss, Memory, and Love

It's in the quiet and contemplative moments that Flowers can be seen to grow.

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‘London Has Fallen’ Is Rife With Absurdity and Vapidity

This film's absurdity is hammered home by repeated deployments of surveillance monitors, social media, video game images, the Internet, and cell phones.

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‘Zootopia’ Is An Amazing Animated Allegory and One of Disney’s Best

A flashy cartoon feast that deals with the concept of racism? Yes, Zootopia lives up to that promise, and offers much, much more. As with any work of art, the conversation it creates is as important as the entertainment value offered.

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‘Ava’s Possessions’ Is a New Spin on Possession Horror

While underdeveloped in character and story, the originality of Ava's Possessions, as well as its decadent visual aesthetic, go a long way towards making it a unique and interesting take on a stale genre.

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‘Beat Street’ Vividly Captures the Early Hip-Hop Years

As a document of the early days of hip-hop, Beat Street still holds its own as one of the films to have captured the musical culture in its most transitional phase.

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2 Mar 2016 // 10:30 AM

‘Admiral’ Enjoys a Degree of Poetic License

In its fascination with decoration and display, Admiral confirms Fredric Jameson’s claim that postmodernity reduces the past to “a vast collection of images”.

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Dancing Up a Storm in ‘Valentino’

Filmmaker Ken Russell will never be accused of subtlety. However, his wide-eyed and over-the-top stylizing in Valentino is undeniably engaging.

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Compelling Sociopaths and ‘The American Friend’

Dennis Hopper brings out the sociopathic characteristics of Tom Ripley in Wim Wenders' The American Friend.

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In ‘Eddie the Eagle’, Christopher Walken Is the Best Right Thing

Earnest and naïve, less cute than aggressively geeky, Eddie is something of a walking punchline in his own movie. And then he meets Bronson Perry (Hugh Jackman).

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‘Triple 9’ Is Full of Heists, Cops, and Wasted Talents

John Hillcoat’s heist flick brings an embarrassment of acting riches to bear on a laughably disjointed script that can’t decide whether to go for self-seriousness or self-parody.

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‘Backtrack’ and Adrian Brody’s Suffering Visage

Peter (Brody) is beset by Gothic clichés: he walks empty city streets, rarely sees daylight, cues lashing rain, and attracts an entire practice of ghosts who really don’t like him very much at all.

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‘Inside Llewyn Davis’ Is Subdued But Undeniably Affecting

The Coens' Inside Llewyn Davis isn’t overwhelming at first glance, but it has a perfect, natural rhythm and flow that you don’t even notice how it sticks in your head.

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Moving Pixels Podcast: Our Own Points of View on 'Hardcore Henry'

// Moving Pixels

"Hardcore Henry gives us a chance to consider not how well a video game translates to film, but how well a video game point of view translates to film.

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