Reviews > Film
Festival: The Criterion Collection

They just don't make documentaries like Festival anymore.

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Aaron Katz’s ‘Gemini’ Frames Him as a Storyteller with a Clear and Decisive Vision

While a deceptively simple film, beneath Gemini's visually polished skin lies a social awareness of the foibles of the media, and its consumption within contemporary culture.

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Family Flavours in Mike Leigh’s ‘Life is Sweet’

Family, friends, and food form the focus of Leigh’s broad but funny, relatable and affectionate 1990 film, which here receives a welcome Blu-ray and DVD re-release from BFI.

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‘Baby Driver’ Really Really Wants to Be Cool, Which is Not Cool

If this seriocomic heist flick about a music-obsessed getaway driver had more on its mind than some killer tracks, it might have been a blast.

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‘The Departure’ Casts a Loving Gaze Upon an Unconventional Buddhist Priest

The Departure is a searching study of a universally relatable character who has seen a great deal of sorrow in this world.

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The Incessant Violation in Aronofsky’s ‘Mother!’ Makes Me Mad in a Good Way

The house, wife, and their shared outcry against violation are dangerously tied to white feminism. Viewing Mother! from a racial context circumscribes the power of its possible feminist message.

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‘Professor Marston and the Wonder Women’ Will Have Captain America Squirming in His Skivvies

This film is a clever and provocative look at love, sexuality, and the lies that preserve our fragile happiness.

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Sex in 1968: A Joe Sarno Double-Shot

All the Sins of Sodom and Vibrations's tales of talky, restless, desperate, and sex-starved middle-class Americans.

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Bava, Baby, Bava! Three Films from Italy’s Horror Maestro

Erik the Conqueror, Roy Colt and Winchester Jack and Kill Baby Kill show Bava's colorful ways with the camera.

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‘The Mountain Between Us’ Is All Glory, No Guts

The Mountain Between Us is an easily digestible romance that might have been more interesting if it were a bit harder to swallow.

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In Many Ways, ‘Blade Runner 2049’ Is Better Than Its Predecessor

A near-flawless audio-visual presentation and fascinating ideas make Blade Runner 2049 Villeneuve's best.

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‘Blade Runner 2049’ Is an Ambitious Vision of Startling Cinematic Beauty

Director Denis Villeneuve takes everything that was iconic about Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner and expands it into a sprawling examination of hope, destiny, and creation.

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‘Una’: The Woman Who Would Not Go Away

Rooney Mara haunts Ben Mendelsohn with an unspeakable truth in this tightly wound actor’s class drama about buried secrets and shattered lives.

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‘Battle of the Sexes’ Serves up Bland Drama

Co-directors Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris capture the atmosphere of a tumultuous time, but this complicated story winds up a frustrating hodgepodge of tantalizing ideas and unconvincing drama.

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28 Sep 2017 // 9:30 AM

TIFF 2017: Woman Walks Ahead

This film confuses different types of oppression, and seems to propose that people who’ve experienced misogyny are uniquely qualified to understand racism and vice versa.

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27 Sep 2017 // 8:29 AM

TIFF 2017: My Days of Mercy

As an indictment of the death penalty, the most unsettling aspect of My Days of Mercy is in how it presents the terrifying orderliness of taking a human life.

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26 Sep 2017 // 8:30 AM

TIFF 2017: High Fantasy

High Fantasy presents a brilliant take on the sci-fi body-switching genre, transforming a device that’s usually used for laughs into one that uncovers deeper truths about the complex nature of identity.

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25 Sep 2017 // 10:30 AM

TIFF 2017: What Will People Say

The culture clash in What Will People Say is manifest in a life-and-death difference between interpretations of defiance.

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‘Battle of the Sexes’ Whiffs the Serve

This easy-rock dramatization of the 1973 blockbuster match between Billie Jean King and past-his-prime champ Bobby Riggs has its moments but can’t capture the liberating drama of the moment.

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In ‘Bobbi Jene’, a Dancer’s Artistic Vision Is Rooted in Personal Sacrifice

While Bobbi Jene often veers too closely to melodrama, seeing an emboldened woman artistically express her sexuality and earn effusive praise for it is inspirational.

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NYFF 2017: 'Mudbound'

// Notes from the Road

"Dee Rees’ churning and melodramatic epic follows two families in 1940s Mississippi, one black and one white, and the wars they fight abroad and at home.

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