Reviews > Music
Stars: There Is No Love in Fluorescent Light

Listening to Stars' new album is like being wrapped in a warm, comforting blanket. A catchy synth-pop blanket where our biggest concerns are who we're dating, not what's going on in the world at large.

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Deradoorian: Eternal Recurrence

Following a very open and expansive record, Deradoorian dives into a minimalistic state with Eternal Recurrence, exposing all the subtlety and emotion of her music.

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Larry Campbell and Teresa Williams: Contraband Love

The truest Americana doesn’t just convey sound; it captures feeling. On their sophomore release, Campbell and Williams prove themselves masters of the form in the fullest sense.

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Sudan Archives: Sudan Archives

Whatever you think you know about violin music, forget it. On her debut EP, Sudan Archives redefines what four strings can do.

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Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever: Talk Tight

The Melbourne band's first EP gets an official US release.

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9 Oct 2017 // 8:35 AM

Mike Stern: Trip

Mike Stern has fallen. Trip shows that he can get back up just fine.

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9 Oct 2017 // 8:24 AM

David Crosby: Sky Trails

David Crosby gets a second (third? fourth?) wind and releases two albums in less than a year. Good ones, too...

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Kamasi Washington: Harmony of Difference

Compared to Kamasi Washington's previous record, The Epic, the duration of the trip might have been minimized, but the scope and purpose of the artist has not wearied in Harmony of Difference.

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9 Oct 2017 // 7:54 AM

Kelela: Take Me Apart

Kelela's excellent debut manages to evoke megastar crooners from decades past, cyborgs from the future, and, unmistakably, the defining sounds of pop music's present.

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Downtown Boys: Cost of Living

Cost of Living isn’t just a punk album with “something to say”; it is one that boasts an impressively sustainable ideology.

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Carole King: Tapestry - Live in Hyde Park

Carole King’s seminal 1971 album Tapestry forms the core of this live album celebrating her long career and immense legacy as influential songwriter and musician.

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Various Artists: The Rough Guide to the Music of West Africa

Choice cuts from the vast range of music in West Africa make for another polished installment of the Rough Guides collection.

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Human Existence, in One Album: Ólafur Arnalds’ ‘Eulogy for Evolution’ Ten Years Later

Ólafur Arnalds' stunning debut Eulogy for Evolution, still his masterpiece, remains a gorgeous and disquieting vision of human life.

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5 Oct 2017 // 7:37 AM

Ledisi: Let Love Rule

Ledisi sings with emotional swoops. She lets her voice climb the scales and create beats that emphasize strong feelings.

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5 Oct 2017 // 7:28 AM

Mirah: Sundial

Classic Mirah tracks get a sophisticated boost from sweeping strings on Sundial.

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Chelsea Wolfe: Hiss Spun

Wolfe's fifth studio album continues to aggressively pursue metal and industrial music, making for an enrapturing listen all the way through.

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No Use for a Name: Rarities Vol. 1: The Covers

No Use for a Name's posthumous covers collection is fun but slight. And because the focus is on non-album tracks, it's missing the band's best covers.

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4 Oct 2017 // 2:30 AM

Liam Gallagher: As You Were

Liam Gallagher answers all the questions about whether he can cut it as a solo artist on audience-pleasing rock 'n' roll record.

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Susanne Sundfør: Music for People in Trouble

Susanne Sundfør is quiet and loud in her introspection, creating an album that is flexible in its sound and glorious in its self-meditation.

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4 Oct 2017 // 2:15 AM

Tricky: ununiform

Looking back signals hope for the future.

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NYFF 2017: 'Mudbound'

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