Reviews > Music
Fred Anderson and Hamid Drake: From the River to the Ocean

A Chicago jazz vet surrounds himself with an eclectic mix of avant-garde musicians and post-rock types.

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22 Apr 2007 // 11:05 PM

Phonograph: Phonograph

Brooklyn, New York's Phonograph adeptly weave electronic sounds, ambient textures and fine layers of production together with a folk rock shuffle.

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22 Apr 2007 // 11:04 PM

Justine Electra: Soft Rock

Australian-born, Berlin resident, Justine Electra has been a fixture on the German underground tek-house scene for the last few years.

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Jenny Owen Youngs: Batten the Hatches

Jenny Owen Youngs has a different musical take on things, and it's a very refreshing one.

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Frivolous: Midnight Black Indulgence

Seemingly as unsure of what it's trying to accomplish as we are of what to do with it.

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John D. Loudermilk: The Open Mind of John D. Loudermilk

A fantastic-sounding reissue of one of the most original songwriters in 1960s Nashville, who penned hits for Johnny Cash and Paul Revere and the Raiders.

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Arctic Monkeys: Favourite Worst Nightmare

Although lacking the pop of their debut, these UK indie rockers continue to evolve, turning out a strong batch of thorny songs on their sophomore album.

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22 Apr 2007 // 11:00 PM

Static-X: Cannibal

The bitch is back. Static-X puts the pedal back to the metal on their fifth album.

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Various Artists: Bargrooves Black Vol. 2

The second installment of the Bargrooves Black establishes early on an entirely conventional "groove" sound – soul-infused, low-tempo House seasoned with varying degrees of electro, disco, tech. You know, the usual.

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Vusi Mahlasela: Guiding Star

Though its 16 tracks vary in subject, style, and dynamic, each seems to be an unadulterated cry from Mahlasela's soul.

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The Blow: Poor Aim: Love Songs

With this reissue of a 2004 EP, the Blow shows us where it has been and where it is going, and the results are surprisingly solid.

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22 Apr 2007 // 11:00 PM

Pela: Anytown Graffiti

Pela are a self-styled "American" rock and roll band, with Bruce Springsteen, The Replacements, Wilco, and the Hold Steady as guiding influences.

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22 Apr 2007 // 11:00 PM

Pat Martino: El Hombre

A lovely Rudy Van Gelder-remastered reissue of the great guitarist's solo debut, a 1967 date with organ, flute, and speed

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19 Apr 2007 // 11:04 PM

All Smiles: Ten Readings of a Warning

All Smiles' album stimulates something less like "all smiles" and more like "partial heartbreak".

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The Saturday Knights: The Saturday Knights

Rumor has it there's a band in Seattle, Washington with a smooth hip-hop flow backed by face-melting guitars. Truth is, it's not just a rumor.

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Escape the Floodwater Jug Band: Whiskey Will Fix It!

Iowa-based jug band go back to the banjo and washboard-driven music of the Hoover administration for inspiration on their debut.

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19 Apr 2007 // 11:01 PM

Chateau Flight: Les Vampires

Even divorced from the images they accompany, this 40-minute work stands on its own remarkably well, smartly jettisoning aside the notions of both the pop song and tension-filled cinematic score to create a moody, distinct electronic work.

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19 Apr 2007 // 11:00 PM

Team Shadetek: Pale Fire

Two New York producers break out of the boroughs with a full-length debut that's both streetwise and eclectic.

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The Ark: Prayer for the Weekend

The Swedish band's fourth album takes everything that was great about last year's State of the Ark and supersizes it, a gluttonous allowance by a band that has every right to have the world eating from the palm of its hand.

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The Zombies: Live at the Bloomsbury Theatre, London

Forty years after their groundbreaking, wonderful, alternatively-spelled Odessey and Oracle, Colin Blunstone and Rod Argent form a cheesy Zombies cover band.

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