Reviews > Music
Human Existence, in One Album: Ólafur Arnalds’ ‘Eulogy for Evolution’ Ten Years Later

Ólafur Arnalds' stunning debut Eulogy for Evolution, still his masterpiece, remains a gorgeous and disquieting vision of human life.

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5 Oct 2017 // 7:37 AM

Ledisi: Let Love Rule

Ledisi sings with emotional swoops. She lets her voice climb the scales and create beats that emphasize strong feelings.

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5 Oct 2017 // 7:28 AM

Mirah: Sundial

Classic Mirah tracks get a sophisticated boost from sweeping strings on Sundial.

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Chelsea Wolfe: Hiss Spun

Wolfe's fifth studio album continues to aggressively pursue metal and industrial music, making for an enrapturing listen all the way through.

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No Use for a Name: Rarities Vol. 1: The Covers

No Use for a Name's posthumous covers collection is fun but slight. And because the focus is on non-album tracks, it's missing the band's best covers.

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4 Oct 2017 // 2:30 AM

Liam Gallagher: As You Were

Liam Gallagher answers all the questions about whether he can cut it as a solo artist on audience-pleasing rock 'n' roll record.

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Susanne Sundfør: Music for People in Trouble

Susanne Sundfør is quiet and loud in her introspection, creating an album that is flexible in its sound and glorious in its self-meditation.

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4 Oct 2017 // 2:15 AM

Tricky: ununiform

Looking back signals hope for the future.

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3 Oct 2017 // 8:12 AM

Bubblemath: Edit Peptide

At times thrilling, at times frustrating, Edit Peptide contains the highs and lows of highly technical math and prog rock all in one package.

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Noah Gundersen: White Noise

On White Noise, Gundersen fully transitions from a pensive folk singer to a layered rock star.

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Lucinda Williams: This Sweet Old World

Redoing an entire album is a surprising and bold move, but on This Sweet Old World the gambit pays off. It's anything but a retread.

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Alex Lahey: I Love You Like a Brother

Alex Lahey has made a rock record for the worst in us, and it’s awesome and powerful and liberating.

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3 Oct 2017 // 2:15 AM

David Virelles: Gnosis

An ambitious work of modern composition, Gnosis is an astounding feat from a relatively young musician on today's modern jazz front.

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2 Oct 2017 // 8:16 AM

Raleigh: Powerhouse Bloom

The mildly psychedelic title is spot on; this a creatively fertile album.

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Starsailor: All This Life

After an eight-year hiatus, Starsailor returns with their best album yet.

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The Orchids: Who Needs Tomorrow… a 30 Year Retrospective

Their influences were out in the open for all to see, but this Orchids retrospective sums up the sweet joy of these jangle-pop stalwarts.

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2 Oct 2017 // 7:47 AM

Whitney Rose: Rule 62

Keeping the balance between human drama and melodrama is a neat trick. Rose sings in a whispery, honey-dripped voice about life’s existential questions to a two-step beat and the twang of a steel guitar.

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Kaitlyn Aurelia Smith: The Kid

Kaitlyn Aurelia Smith’s compositions spotlight timbre over bombast, invoking the calm of a mother’s song.

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Nick Photinos: Petits Artéfacts

Photinos champions a wealth of intriguing contemporary composers with his collection of solo, chamber, and electroacoustic works.

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Various Artists: Soul of a Nation - Afro-Centric Visions in the Age of Black Power

A thought-provoking collection of Afro-centric tracks from the '60s and '70s put together to accompany this summer's show at the Tate Modern in London.

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