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Wednesday, April 2 2014

John Zorn: Fragmentations, Prayers and Interjections

A 46-minute experiment and an anticipation of more things to come rarely -- very rarely -- are so beautifully crafted.


Frankie Cosmos: Zentropy

Frankie Cosmos makes excellently witty and crushingly sad indie-pop on her fantastic debut.


Emerson, Lake & Palmer: Live in Montreal 1977

A fine collection of ELP doing what ELP was known for: flashy sounds, lengthy compositions, and gaudy playing. Brilliant and complex, yet soulless and repetitive.


Tuesday, April 1 2014

Nickel Creek: A Dotted Line

For its first album in nine years, Nickel Creek tames down the displays of virtuosity that defined much of their previous albums, offering up a more pastoral take on their otherwise “newgrass" take on bluegrass.


Tokyo Police Club: Forcefield

If Forcefield is about hitting you in the moment, it does that. Sadly, too many of these songs don't last for whatever moment comes next.


YYU: Kiss As We Walk

Experimental hip-hop meets abstract singer-songwriting on YYU's debut 12" record for RAMP Recordings.


The Belle Brigade: Just Because

Backboned with lush layers and driven by dreamy rhythms, the brother-sister-led band takes on a slightly darker indie edge.


Archie Shepp / Attica Blues Orchestra: I Hear the Sound

More than 40 years later, the saxophonist, activist, and free-jazz pioneer revisits his musical response to the Attica Prison uprising.


Monday, March 31 2014

Cloud Nothings: Here and Nowhere Else

On 2012's breakthrough Attack on Memory, Cloud Nothings' displayed a visceral, physical angst, focused on a series of anti-mantras. That album's great follow-up, Here and Nowhere Else, reveals the frantic mindset behind those calls to (in)action.


Glenn Tilbrook: Happy Ending

Quixotic (and that's just the name of the record label!) and plough-your-own-furrow he may be. But Glenn Tilbrook has the matchless quality to write a tune to his own enduring voice.


Koen Holtkamp: Motion

Holtkamp, of the duo Mountains, once again blurs the line between organic and electronic on Motion, an album that becomes a fascinating series of reversals and inversions.


Cheatahs: Cheatahs

While Cheatahs' self-titled debut might be in need of some streamlining, there are a few stunners hiding within this shoegaze release.


Dierks Bentley: Riser

A stripped down version of this overwrought and over-weighted album could have provided a way out of Nashville's doldrums.


Friday, March 28 2014

Miles Davis: Miles at the Fillmore - Miles Davis 1970: The Bootleg Series Vol. 3

Recorded just months after Bitches Brew and available in their entirely for the first time, these sets show that if Davis was a mad scientist in the studio, he was still a sorcerer on stage.


Shit Robot: We Got a Love

The DFA producer is weighed down by his guests on his second album.


Danilo Perez: Panama 500

The astonishing pianist brings out two different trios, some strings, percussion, and native Panamanian chant to celebrate the anniversary of his homeland.


Milagres: Violent Light

There's a lot of beauty on the second album by this Brooklyn band, but the songs suffer from a museum-like coldness.


Uncle Tupelo: No Depression

If you care a thing for rock ‘n’ roll, country, or American music in general, No Depression is simply essential.


Thursday, March 27 2014

Mr Little Jeans: Pocketknife

Easily one of the best albums of the year thus far, few debut records brush up against perfection as effortlessly as Mr Little Jeans’ Pocketknife.


Howler: World of Joy

"Hey Howler, what are you rebelling against?" "What a-ya got?"


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