Reviews > TV
How Does a Trader Make 60 Percent in a Year? ‘Frontline: To Catch a Trader’

It appears that rules are rules and laws are laws… sometimes.

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‘Robin Redbreast’ and the Creeping Horrors of a Rural Idyll

Released for the first time on DVD, the BBC's 1970 drama is a disturbing film concerning the grim underbelly of sinister rural rituals, and those that adhere to them.

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‘Intelligence’ Begins with a Promising Conundrum

The smartest parts of Intelligence concern debates over Gabriel's malfunctions as a machine, even as they feel emotional bonds with him.

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‘The Curse of Oak Island’: Slow Going

The Curse of Oak Island, by title and general aesthetic, focuses on building up the strange aspects of island lore. But the first episodes don't offer much mystery.

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Scratch Beneath the Surface of ‘Dead of Night’, If You Dare

If you are patient you will be rewarded with intellectual stimulation, and a tone of general strangeness that will creep insidiously under your skin.

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America Needs Great Public Universities: ‘At Berkeley’

The idea of public education is at once gloriously and unbearably ambitious.

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‘Youngstown Boys’: Maurice Clarett Redux

All this is to say that even if Maurice Clarett had insight into the game of football, he might not have understood the larger game.

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‘The Fall’ Is an Audacious Police Procedural

Programs like BBC Two’s The Fall should be commended for doing everything “wrong” in terms of pleasing the demands of commercial television.

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11 Dec 2013 // 10:45 AM

The Flashy Trashy Aesthetics of ‘Rodeo Girls’

Are these girl-power barrel racers post-feminist figures?

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What We Think of as Photoshopping Existed Decades Before Photoshop

Despite containing any number of intriguing moments, A History From Behind the Lens fails to provide a coherent overview of the art form.

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‘30 for 30: Bernie and Ernie’ and One More Step in the End to Racism

In basketball, Bernard King, a shy, thoughtful child living in a "rough" part of Brooklyn, found a means to self-expression and purpose.

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‘How Sherlock Changed the World’ Is Far Too Elementary

Is there really a causal link between Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s fictional character and modern-day crime investigation techniques?

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8 Dec 2013 // 10:30 AM

‘One Life’ Makes the Invisible Visible

The documentary may speak more to our similarities with the vicious, indifferent, and self-interested creatures at its centre than the representatives of animal cuteness.

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‘Mob City’: An Homage to the Seamy Streets of Films Noirs and the Pulp Novels That Inspired Them

The premiere suggests exactly why this period isn't more often plundered by television, namely, the extraordinary difficulty of shaking off the popular culture clichés of the period.

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‘The Battle of amfAR’ and the Power of Celebrity to Provoke Change

A star who lamented the wages of fame for most of her life, Elizabeth Taylor embraced the spotlight in order to raise awareness and money regarding AIDS.

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A Slice of History Captured on Film Has Never Been so Dually Satisfying and Terrifying

WWII in HD is required viewing for its high-minded ideals and its near-flawless execution. It makes other films on the subject matter pale in comparison.

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‘Peaky Blinders’ Offers Violent Reminders of England’s Forgotten Midland

Like Jimmy Darmody, his Boardwalk Empire counterpart, Tommy Shelby has grown up to find all Gods dead and all faiths in man shaken -- but not quite all wars fought.

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‘Toxic Hot Seat’ Exposes the Poisons in Everyone’s Homes

When questions came up as to the toxicity of flame retardants, the three primary manufacturers made their case with faulty studies or deliberate misreadings of studies.

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25 Years of Carving Turkeys: ‘Mystery Science Theater 3000: 25th Anniversary Edition’

Six of the very best episodes and a treasure trove of extras make this boxed set worthy of commemorating the 25th anniversary of one of the funniest shows ever made.

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‘Treme’ Keeps Its Head Above Water… for Just a Little Bit Longer

Treme is the most kaleidoscopic show being produced these days. Its artistry in the arc of the episodes demonstrates gorgeous design throughout the season.

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A Chat with José González at Newport Folk Festival

// Notes from the Road

"José González's sets during Newport Folk Festival weren't on his birthday (that is today) but each looked to be a special intimate performance.

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