Reviews > TV
‘Frontline: Separate and Unequal’: The Case Against Resegregation

Gary Orfield, co-director of the Civil Rights Project at UCLA, points out, "People who do things that have racial implications always say that race has nothing to do with it."

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Guillermo del Toro’s Vampires Are Let Loose in ‘The Strain’

People must make choices, dire, resonant, tragic, repeatedly in The Strain.

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Vengeance Is the Motive for Almost Everyone in Season 2 of ‘The Bridge’

While vengeance is surely a reliable dramatic device, its use here is also potentially more far-reaching.

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Halle Berry Lands on TV for ‘Extant’

Flashbacks appear first as if in her mind (via circular mirrors and quaint iris transitions) and then as if on digital recording (on a tablet), neither obviously accurate.

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The Groundbreaking Wonderfulness of ‘I Spy’

I Spy is filled with revolutionary diversity, exotic filming locations, and a textbook example of on screen chemistry.

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You’ll Lose Your Religion in ‘The Leftovers’

The cop and the reverend spend the first few episodes starting or not avoiding fights, their faces increasingly bruised and bloodied, increasingly emblems of disorder.

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Word Play, Opera, ‘Endeavour’

Both Endeavour, and its parent series Inspector Morse make a point of juxtaposing a lovely illusion of Oxford with the city's uglier realities.

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The Sophistication, Charm and Murders in ‘Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries’

The mysteries are consistently smart and well done, but it's the relationships between the characters that really make the show.

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‘The First World War: The Complete Series’ Is an Outstanding Primer on This Multi-Faceted Conflict

Often overshadowed by the World War II 20 years later, the Great War remains, in many sad ways, the yardstick for futility, pointlessness and waste.

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‘Brazil With Monty Python’s Michael Palin’ Isn’t the Brazil You’re Thinking of

This BBC series is a nice way to learn some things about the world's fifth largest country, which is hosting the 2014 World Cup and the 2016 Summer Olympics.

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David Tennant Is a Brilliant Barrister in ‘The Escape Artist’

Will (David Tennant) may be his chambers' most promising barrister, but he's flamboyant and ruthless only in the courtroom.

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Man-Sized Hamsters Haunt London’s Tube in ‘Doctor Who: The Web of Fear’

“The Web of Fear” illustrates why mostly unseen monsters work much better than their fully-formed cousins.

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‘Remembering the Artist, Robert De Niro, Sr.’: The Actor on His Father

A contemplation of how art might be valued, how eras might be defined, and how artists survive adversity.

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It’s Out with the Old, in with the Older in ‘Doctor Who: The Time of the Doctor’

With the Doctor's many regenerations, we see our Time Lord reincarnated with different mannerisms and taste in just about everything but the almost universally garish clothing.

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Celebrating a Remarkable 50-Year ‘Adventure in Space and Time’

Long-time fan and Doctor Who scriptwriter Mark Gatiss guides us through the first episode of what would become television’s longest running sci-fi show.

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PC-Cloning Has Gone Mad in ‘Halt and Catch Fire’

Halt and Catch Fire isn't about the Steve Jobs or the Bill Gateses. It's about the other guys who rushed in and tried to make a fortune in their wake.

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‘Call the Midwife: Season Three’ Shifts from Learning Curves to Relationships

These stories are always engaging, not only because midwifery in the '50s is so interesting, but also because the midwives themselves are fully realized characters.

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Quirks, Neurosis, Irrational Behavior and ‘The Bob Newhart Show’

It shouldn’t work, turning psychiatric patients into cartoons; it should be more more offensive than it is. Somehow, though, it all just ends up being good for a laugh.

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‘Doctor Who’ Minus the What, When, Why and Where

Patrick Troughton is amazing in his dual roles in Doctor Who: The Enemy of the World, but this long-lost serial is short on the thrills.

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The Playbook of Marketing Was Turned on Its Ear by Social Media

Douglas Rushkoff’s Frontline: Generation Like discovers that teens, it seems, are happy to work for free, essentially doing the work of the advertisers.

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Perspectives on Death in 'Game of Thrones - A Nest of Vipers'

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"How do you decide who lives and who dies?

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