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Wednesday, July 24 2002

The Father Costume and Notable American Women by Ben Marcus

About Ben Marcus there is so much to be discussed but nothing, really, to be explained.


The Last Report on the Miracles at Little No Horse by Louise Erdrich

a vivid world where floods are described as 'gray soup,' a woman's bound breasts as 'small, withered, modest as folded flowers,' pansies as having 'the faces of spoiled babies,' and horses as having coats of 'brutal velvet.'"


Lummox: The Evolution of Man by Mike Magnuson

Perhaps it's stereotypical, but men who drink American beer and watch football aren't even supposed to read books, much less write them. Magnuson, however, has bucked the stereotype. He is a regular blue-collar guy, but he's also a damn good fiction writer.


A Jacques Barzun Reader: Selections from his Works by Michael Murray, Editor

As a comprehensive anthology, 'A Reader' has wired into its DNA the tendency to deflect attention from the subject at hand in order to illuminate by refraction the face of the writer.


Boat Bastard: A Love/Hate Memoir by Deborah van Rooyen

The poster child of tell-all, slam-the-bastard, blame-anyone-but-yourself books.


As I Live and Breathe, Notes of a Patient-Doctor by Jamie Weisman, M.D.

It is clear that her enthusiasm for life has influenced her enthusiasm for writing and medicine.  The reader of 'As I Live and Breathe' will likely finish the book with a newfound appreciation for illness, medicine, and life in general.


Monday, July 22 2002

Shenandoah: The Washington and Lee Unviersity Review

Edited by R. T. Smith Washington & Lee University Published quarterly, 1 year, $22; 2 years, $40; 3 years, $54. Speaking the Mother Tongue of Art Literary journals in the United


Wednesday, July 17 2002

A Soldier of the Revolution by Ward Just

The novel treats a subject of current political debate: our President's peculiar enthusiasm for turning many of our social obligations over to 'faith based' philanthropic organizations.


Something to Declare by Julian Barnes

He scourges the catacombs of literature and prose, and presents you with a glittering selection of informative gems.


Our Post-Human Future: Consequences of the Biotechnology Revolution by Francis Fukuyama

According to Fukuyama, this Pandora's box can still be shut, but only if we marshal the appropriate scientific and political forces and legislate our way to a safer tomorrow.


Hell to Pay by George Pelecanos

Pelecanos is a lifelong resident of the nation's capital who has observed gentrification erode whatever character or sense of continuity the environment once possessed.


A Great, Silly Grin: The British Satire Boom of the 1960s by Humphrey Carpenter

Satire's audiences have always tended to come from the very section of society that is being satirized.


Great Presidential Wit (I Wish I Was in the Book) by Bob Dole

If you had your doubts about Dole before, this will only confirm the worst of them.


Bad Fads by Mark A. Long

College students are often credited with the more bizarre fads which seem to have all been popularized briefly, then forgotten as soon as another trend hit the scene.


Thursday, June 27 2002

Paper Moon by Joe David Brown

The book, published in 1971 (originally entitled 'Addie Pray') caught the interest of Hollywood and renowned director, Peter Bogdanovich, who made Brown's story into an overwhelmingly successful film, starring Ryan O'Neal and his daughter, Tatum, and called it 'Paper Moon'. The rest, as they say, is history.


Faunal by Peter Reading

His misanthropy is always legitimised by a political motivation (in the case of this book, a kind of anarchic eco-awareness), so it never quite veers into the ranting to which it nevertheless approximates.


Destroy: Sex Pistols 1977 byDennis Morris

The Sex Pistols staged a reunion in 1996 that met with mixed reviews and are scheduled to reform this summer. Both comebacks have prompted the question 'How can you do a Sex Pistols show without Sid Vicious'"


Can’t Be Satisfied. The Life and Times of Muddy Waters by Robert Gordon

Gordon brings to his subject a fan's admiration for the music without abandoning a historian's dedication to detail. His language is rich and evocative, particularly when he conjures up the sound of one of Muddy's most famous works.


The Black Veil: A Memoir With Digressions by Rick Moody

The book itself, eschewing the traditional memoir's approach to laying out the facts and hoping -- simply by the act of writing -- to come to terms with a life, makes no claim at understanding, or for that matter, judgment.


About the Author by John Colapinto

In Cal Cunningham, Colapinto has created a character so urbanely amoral and artlessly adept at deception of self and others that he could have stepped out of the pages of 'The Portrait of Dorian Gray'.


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