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Reviews

Wednesday, June 5 2002

The Heavy-Petting Zoo by Clare Pollard

Clare Pollard's poems compulsively re-enact the reaching out to life and the withdrawing in pain.


Wednesday, May 29 2002

Lynx Eye

Quality fiction filtered through the keenly discerning eyes of diverse writers.


The White Family by Maggie Gee

Maggie Gee's eighth novel continues her fictional analysis of the social problems of contemporary England, and does so with the deftness and sureness of touch that readers already familiar with her work have come to expect.


Whitegirl by Kate Manning

A good effort for a first novel, and one that shows promise for Manning's future endeavors.


That Takes Ovaries! Edited by Rivka Solomon

Empowerment is quite the prevalent theme in this book.


One More for the Road by Ray Bradbury

Mr. Bradbury can conjure up, in just a few deceptively throwaway sentences, more meaning and insight than most other authors could provide in many, many pages.


The Eye of Cybele by Daniel Chavarria (Translated by Carlos Lopez)

Akashic gives us 'The Eye of Cybele', a novel set as far away in space and time from his last as it is possible to be.


Chicken, Self-Portrait of a Young Man for Rent by David Henry Sterry

Sterry, a chicken no longer, brave enough to tell his tale, hoping it will do others some good.


Conversations with Richard Ford by Huey Guagliardo, Editor

Ford just may be the least catty writer in history. 'Other people's successes do not diminish you, your failures don't help others.'"


American Cultural Studies Edited by Catherine A. Warren and Mary Douglas Vavrus

'Are we, as intellectuals, really all that qualified to lead society?' she remarks, then later states succinctly, 'The public is us.'"


Wednesday, May 22 2002

The World’s Smallest Book Edited by Josua Reichert

With their stunning style and remarkable substance, these books are quickly becoming the maximum indulgence for any connoisseur of printed matter.


Steven Soderbergh Interviews by Anthony Kaufman, editor

His films are smart, stylish, and substantive, and he's made his peace with Hollywood without selling out -- truly a hero for our time.


Ridin’ High, Livin’ Free: Hell-Raising Motorcycle Stories by Ralph “Sonny” Barger, Keith and Kent Zi

It's unclear whether Barger is feeling his age or atoning for his sins, but it appears he has become an apologist, which is the last thing any biker, especially a Hell's Angel, should be.


Montana History Weekends: 52 Adventures in History by Dave Conklin

Montana is big, very little of it is national park, and David Conklin has given us a guide book that opens a new aspect of the Big Sky, its historic places, to visitors and residents alike.


Blood Orchid. An Unnatural History of America by Charles Bowden

The balanced appreciation of our appetites that has consumed Charles Bowden for over 25 years has become an increasingly demanding enterprise.


Bright Earth: Art and the Invention of Color by Philip Ball

It's a thick work full of tangents and an occasional jangle of jargon that pops up like a current of cold water.


Monday, May 13 2002

You Know Better by Tina McElroy Ansa

Though definitely Southern in tone, 'You Know Better' delves into core problems currently plaguing the African-American community across the country. Never mind that Mulberry is a small-town; the issues addressed are rampant from New York to Chicago to Los Angeles.


Spy’s Fate by Arnaldo Correa

Correa's 'Spy's Fate' is a must for any spy novel enthusiast. Beyond this, the book is an important political statement, and being written in a Cuban voice, it is an amazing one.


Movie Love in the Fifties by James Harvey

Harvey wishes to illustrate how by appealing to and then upsetting the kinds of emotional allegiance audiences give to established cinematic conventions, a more complex and compelling kind of affection emerges, one drawn by oddity and extremity and not the tried and true.


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