Hello, Hypocrisy, My Old Friend: 'The Religion of the Future'

Hello, Hypocrisy, My Old Friend: 'The Religion of the Future'

By Megan Volpert

Roberto Mangabeira Unger eats his own tail in his helpless "new" synthesis of philosophy, religion, and politics. 16 Oct 2017 // 10:30 AM

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//Recent Reviews

9 Oct 2017 // 8:35 AM

Mike Stern: Trip

Mike Stern has fallen. Trip shows that he can get back up just fine.

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Sprung from a $36 Ukulele: ‘Joni: The Anthology’

If Joan Baez was the purest folkie, Judy Collins the chanteuse, then Joni Mitchell was probably the siren.

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9 Oct 2017 // 8:24 AM

David Crosby: Sky Trails

David Crosby gets a second (third? fourth?) wind and releases two albums in less than a year. Good ones, too...

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Kamasi Washington: Harmony of Difference

Compared to Kamasi Washington's previous record, The Epic, the duration of the trip might have been minimized, but the scope and purpose of the artist has not wearied in Harmony of Difference.

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9 Oct 2017 // 7:54 AM

Kelela: Take Me Apart

Kelela's excellent debut manages to evoke megastar crooners from decades past, cyborgs from the future, and, unmistakably, the defining sounds of pop music's present.

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‘Void Star’ Stands Out As Unique and Accomplished Sci-fi

Zachary Mason's Void Star requires some effort, but the reward is a wonderfully immersive plunge into a world that is persuasively novel in some places, and appealingly familiar in others.

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Bava, Baby, Bava! Three Films from Italy’s Horror Maestro

Erik the Conqueror, Roy Colt and Winchester Jack and Kill Baby Kill show Bava's colorful ways with the camera.

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‘Mr. Robot’: Season 2 Widened the Narrative/Character Canvas Beyond Elliot’s Fractured Viewpoint

Disconnecting technology, connecting humans: as the world came apart, Mr. Robot's characters came together in promising new configurations.

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As Thoreau Says, Not As He Does: ‘The Boatman’ and ‘Walden and Civil Disobedience’

It is what Thoreau wrote about how to live -- not, mind you, the way he actually lived -- that makes him a significant cultural figure.

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‘The Mountain Between Us’ Is All Glory, No Guts

The Mountain Between Us is an easily digestible romance that might have been more interesting if it were a bit harder to swallow.

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More Recent Reviews
//Mixed media
//Blogs

NYFF 2017: 'Mudbound'

// Notes from the Road

"Dee Rees’ churning and melodramatic epic follows two families in 1940s Mississippi, one black and one white, and the wars they fight abroad and at home.

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