Game Theory: Lolita Nation

Game Theory: Lolita Nation

By Ed Whitelock

The most critically acclaimed masterpiece of the '80s that you’ve never heard finally sees re-release. Time having been kinder to this long lost album than the music industry, it remains fresh, exciting, and essential for any fan of good pop songwriting. 5 Feb 2016 // 2:30 AM

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Supernatural: Season 11, Episode 12 - "Don't You Forget About Me"

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"In another stand-alone episode, there's a lot of teen drama and some surprises, but not much potential.

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