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Reviews

Sunday, January 1 1995

Startup.com (2001)

The office is burglarized and specific hard drives are missing -- sabotage or coincidence? Is it possible to be paranoid in a business where the stakes are so high and the egos so large?"


Space Cowboys (2000)

Clint Eastwood, I guess, will always see himself as the ultimate icon of masculinity for his generation. The young Eastwood saved the Western film genre


Show Me Love (1999)

Teen romances are a dime a dozen in the U.S. They tend to focus on themes like alienation, individuality, and rebellion against parents, society,


State Property (2002)

PULL.


Someone Like You (2001)

'Someone Like You''s press kit describes Eddie and Jane as a 'Hepburn and Tracy of the modern era', but its undercurrent of painful loss and compulsive grief avoidance is precisely missing from movies like 'Desk Set' and 'Adam's Rib'.


Solomon & Gaenor (1999)

As much as it's being touted as a Welsh Romeo and Juliet, Solomon & Gaenor never quite reaches the level of urgency.


Steal This Movie! (2000)

There is a moment in the 1990 film Flashback, when fictional hippie fugitive Huey Walker (Dennis Hopper) turns to his FBI captor (Kiefer Sutherland) and says, “


Ride with the Devil (1999)

Ride with the Devil is essentially two films in one. The first is a story of loyalty - to family, community, and nation - tested in the social and political upheavals of civil war. The second is a story of male bonding and love in a homosocial order, the negotiation of male-male desire, and male domestication, all triangulated and enabled through the body of a woman.


Riding in Cars With Boys (2001)

In 'Riding in Cars', Barrymore plays to her strengths -- her ability to seem at once disarmingly open, as well as poised, ironic, and above all, delighted to be living her life.


Romeo Must Die (2000)

A car drives through a bridge and dark city streets, passing the freeway sign 'East Bay Bridge, Oakland' on the way. A blasting hip-hop soundtrack accompanies opening film credits in overlapping English and Chinese characters.


Romeo Must Die (2000)

Andrzej Bartkowiak's current film Romeo Must Die, which features the incredible martial arts skills of Jet Li, left me a little depressed.


Remember the Titans (2000)

Even a cursory glance at the coverage of the 2000 Olympics reveals Australia’s presentation of the Games to be focused on diversity and unity through


Ran (1985/2000)

Kurosawa achieves an almost perfect fusion of storyteller and painter.


Return to Me (2000)

The narrative heart of Return to Me beats in rhythm with the tension between surface (what's on the outside) and depth (it's what's inside that counts).


Requiem for a Dream (2000)

Requiem for a Dream begins with a crime in progress. Harry (Jared Leto) is taking his mom’s tv set in order to sell it


Risk (2001)

PULL.


Rush Hour 2 (2001)

Like most sequels, 'Rush Hour 2' does what the first film did, only louder and more extravagantly.


Romance (1999)

It might be expected that the new film by French feminist director Catherine (36 Fillette) Breillat, Romance, is generating more discussion about its shots of pricks and nipples than its narrative or themes or performances. This is a little ironic, because the movie really isn't about erotic arousal or exploitation. In fact, it is, as its title suggests, about romance. Or more precisely, it's about the expectations, disappointments, and power dynamics that shape and destroy romance.


Rat Race (2001)

A balls-out stupid summer comedy where no one cares about special effects or plots making sense or even about characters winning or losing is not a bad thing. It is, rather, a representative thing.


Ready to Rumble (2000)

Ready to Rumble is ostensibly a simple comedy of bumbling bumpkins - in this case lovers of professional wrestling - along the lines of Farrelly brothers' films like Dumb and Dumber and Kingpin.


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