Performer Spotlight:

The Women of Woody Allen's Oeuvre

By PopMatters Staff

1 October 2010

What is it about the women of Woody Allen's filmic universe that sets them apart from mere mortals? Few contemporary directors have created such a pantheon of memorable female characters. All this week we celebrate these performances.
All These Women: PopMatters Talks with Woody Allen and Cast

Woody Allen’s philosophy is to give filmgoers something to believe in; Gemma Jones, Freida Pinto, and Lucy Punch talk with PopMatters about their part in delivering that message in You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger

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Part Four: Gena Rowlands to Evan Rachel Wood

She speaks volumes using downward glances and a few nervous ticks; she's regal, and elegant but also tinged with sweetness and vulnerability; she's volcanic, ribald, and just a little maladroit; she's a vulgarian!; she makes character acting look like performance art...

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Part Three: Diane Keaton to Charlotte Rampling

Woody Allen's lead women serve as bridges between various forms of insanity, provide an air of sophistication and enigma to each role and in one instance, becomes the cold heart at the center of his coldest film: Diane Keaton, Elaine May, Radha Mitchell, Emily Mortimer, Samantha Morton, Geraldine Page and Charlotte Rampling.

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Part Two: Sally Hawkins to Julie Kavner

Woody Allen seems to have a preternatural instinct for discovering intuitively brilliant young actresses such as Sally Hawkins, Barbara Hershey, Mary Beth Hurt,Anjelica Huston, Scarlett Johannson and Julie Kavner.

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Part One: Kirstie Alley to Rebecca Hall

Actors of capable skill, depth and instinct; characters that are neurotic, bitter, and suffer from inner-doubt; the 'foxes' and 'hedgehogs' of Woody Allen's films are portrayed here by Kirstie Alley, Stockard Channing, Patricia Clarkson, Penelope Cruz, Judy Davis, Mia Farrow, Rebecca Hall.

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//Mixed media
//Blogs

Ten Great Criterion Titles: What to Watch and Why

// Short Ends and Leader

"As the Criterion Collection's ever-growing roster shows, there are simply too many great pictures out on home video to know what to do with.

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