Inanna: Butterfly

[16 October 2007]

By Dominic Umile

Contributing Editor

Inanna’s Butterfly EP spans just over 15 minutes in total, and although it’s a portion-controlled serving of lively tech house from the Los Angeles-based producer/DJ, it’s hardly indicative of what she can do. A glance at Spineshaker—a valuable web resource that houses DJ mixes in mp3 format—reveals portraits of Inanna in several moods, with a well-blended assortment of comedown electronica, a proggy techno mix, and a bass-heavy set that launches with Claude Von Stroke’s “Who’s Afraid of Detroit?”. 

On Butterfly b-side “Traces of the Sun,” Inanna pushes her tendency toward a diverse presentation up against the percussion end’s prodding kicks. Machine shop sonics interfere with the track’s rhythm, while a single wavering synth arpeggiation prattles on; in sounding not unlike a dentist’s drill, it’s logically a little numbing. The muted bass’s occasional presence bubbles a little like it did on James Holden’s take on Nathan Fake’s “The Sky Was Pink,” and “Butterfly (Original Mix)” calls for more frequent listens. The glassy melodic tones for the title track are immediate, falling in line in the first few seconds, and they’ll meet bleeps, well-placed clicks, and washes (check the break at 3:36) before this precious entry closes up. Reschedule your hangover: an album’s worth of the first track’s soothing textures would go over pretty well in the living room on a Sunday.

Published at: http://www.popmatters.com/pm/review/inanna-butterfly/