Music

Disco's Not Dead

Image by mayenco from Pixabay (Pixabay License)

In praise of disco on the anniversary of the notorious Disco Demolition Day.

12 July 2009 was the 30th anniversary of Disco Demolition Day, a day when radio host Steve Dahl declared a cultural war on the aforementioned music by blowing up stacks of records in Comiskey Park in Chicago. It's now generally accepted that the seething crowds were at least partially motivated by the subcultural and multicultural context of disco's reign, seeing the gay, black, latino, and women-friendly movement as an affront to the ordained throne of rock, which is at this point mainly a chauvinist enterprise.

That this came at the height of radio's racial re-segregation formatting certainly encouraged the backlash. In the aftermath, disco was declared dead, which was widely accepted as a historical platitude for years, and even still is today. "I think it was a fad and it was probably on its way out. This probably hastened its demise," Steve Dahl said in 2004, reflecting on the incident on Keith Olbermann's Countdown.

While disco may have become a dirty word in mainstream culture after scores of alpha males began parading around in "Disco Sucks" and "Death Before Disco" T-shirts and the clubs began collapsing from the white lines snorted across broken mirror tables, disco continued to expand exponentially. Indeed, years later, the explosion in Comsikey Park seems to have scattered disco's ashes across the globe, where it has manifested in myriad different vital forms. Ironically enough, the two teams playing that night, Detroit and Chicago, became the epicenters of disco's revitalization in both house and techno music.

Below is a smattering of disco from its heyday through the present. It is by no means a complete representation, but hopefully you will agree that this is dynamic and exciting music, whose shelf-life has already far surpassed many of the rock dinosaurs being defended at the time of the disco demolition.

First Choice -- The Player (Philly Groove, 1974)

Cerrone -- Supernature (Atlantic, 1977)

Heatwave -- Groove Line (Epic, 1977)

Coati Mundi ft. Kid Creole -- Mi No Pop I (Ze, 1981)

Bobby O -- She Has a Way (O, 1982)

Trans X -- Living on Video (Polydor, 1983)

Class Action -- Weekend (Jive, 1983)

Aleem -- Release Yourself (NIA, 1984)

Cherelle -- I Didn't Mean to Turn You On (Tabu, 1984)

Escape From New York -- Fire In My Heart (Rollerball, 1984)

Indian Ocean -- School Bell Tree House (Sleeping Bag, 1985)

EPMD -- I'm Housin' (Fresh, 1987)

M/A/R/R/S -- Pump Up the Volume (4AD/Island/Polygram, 1987)

Salt N' Pepa -- Push It (Next Plateau/London, 1987)

Inner City -- Good Life (KMS/ Virgin, 1988)

Tyree -- Hard Core Hip House (DJ International, 1988)

The Untouchables -- Dance to the Rhythm (Strictly Rhythm, 1991)

The Element -- Oh You Got Me (Rhythm Front Mix) (Nervous, 1993)

The Fabulous Baker Boys -- Oh Boy (Ramsey & Fen Mix) (Multiply, 1997)

Herbert with Dani Siciliano -- Around the House (Phonography, 1997)

Todd Edwards -- Never Far From You (i!, 1998)

Data 80 -- Love was Made for Two (Force Tracks, 2001)

Metro Area -- Soft Hoop (Environ, 2002)

Inland Knights -- The Game (Drop Music, 2006)

Professor Genius -- Orange Coco (Tropical Computer System, 2007)


Music

Books

Film

Recent
Music

Deftones Pull a Late-Career Rabbit Out of a Hat with 'Ohms'

Twenty years removed from Deftones' debut album, the iconic alt-metal outfit gel more than ever and discover their poise on Ohms.

Music

Arcade Fire's Will Butler Personalizes History on 'Generations'

Arcade Fire's Will Butler creates bouncy, infectious rhythms and covers them with socially responsible, cerebral lyrics about American life past and present on Generations.

Music

Thelonious Monk's Recently Unearthed 'Palo Alto' Is a Stellar Posthumous Live Set

With a backstory as exhilarating as the music itself, a Thelonious Monk concert recorded at a California high school in 1968 is a rare treat for jazz fans.

Music

Jonnine's 'Blue Hills' Is an Intimate Collection of Half-Awake Pop Songs

What sets experimental pop's Jonnine apart on Blue Hills is her attention to detail, her poetic lyricism, and the indelibly personal touch her sound bears.

Music

Renegade Connection's Gary Asquith Indulges in Creative Tension

From Renegade Soundwave to Renegade Connection, electronic legend Gary Asquith talks about how he continues to produce infectiously innovative music.

Music

A Certain Ratio Return with a Message of Hope on 'ACR Loco'

Inspired by 2019's career-spanning box set, legendary Manchester post-punkers A Certain Ratio return with their first new album in 12 years, ACR Loco.

Books

Oscar Hijuelos' 'Mambo Kings Play the Songs of Love' Dances On

Oscar Hijuelos' dizzyingly ambitious foot-tapping family epic, Mambo Kings Play the Songs of Love, opened the door for Latinx writers to tell their stories in all their richness.

Music

PM Picks Playlist 2: Bamboo Smoke, LIA ICES, SOUNDQ

PopMatters Picks Playlist features the electropop of Bamboo Smoke, LIA ICES' stunning dream folk, Polish producer SOUNDQ, the indie pop of Pylon Heights, a timely message from Exit Kid, and Natalie McCool's latest alt-pop banger.

Film

'Lost Girls and Love Hotels' and Finding Comfort in Sadness

William Olsson's Lost Girls and Love Hotels finds optimism in its message that life tears us apart and puts us back together again differently.

Music

Bright Eyes' 'Down in the Weeds' Is a Return to Form and a Statement of Hope

Bright Eyes may not technically be emo, but they are transcendently expressive, beatifically melancholic. Down in the Weeds is just the statement of grounding that we need as a respite from the churning chaos around us.

Film

What 'O Brother, Where Art Thou?' Gets Right (and Wrong) About America

Telling the tale of the cyclops through the lens of high and low culture, in O'Brother, Where Art Thou? the Coens hammer home a fatalistic criticism about the ways that commerce, violence, and cosmetic Christianity prevail in American society .

Film

Audrey Hepburn + Rome = Grace, Class, and Beauty

William Wyler's Roman Holiday crosses the postcard genre with a hardy trope: Old World royalty seeks escape from stuffy, ritual-bound, lives for a fling with the modern world, especially with Americans.

Music

Colombia's Simón Mejía Plugs Into the Natural World on 'Mirla'

Bomba Estéreo founder Simón Mejía electrifies nature for a different kind of jungle music on his debut solo album, Mirla.

Music

The Flaming Lips Reimagine Tom Petty's Life in Oklahoma on 'American Head'

The Flaming Lips' American Head is a trip, a journey to the past that one doesn't want to return to but never wants to forget.

Music

Tim Bowness of No-Man Discusses Thematic Ambition Amongst Social Division

With the release of his seventh solo album, Late Night Laments, Tim Bowness explores global tensions and considers how musicians can best foster mutual understanding in times of social unrest.

Music

Angel Olsen Creates a 'Whole New Mess'

No one would call Angel Olsen's Whole New Mess a pretty album. It's much too stark. But there's something riveting about the way Olsen coos to herself that's soft and comforting.

Music

Masma Dream World Go Global and Trippy on "Sundown Forest" (premiere)

Dancer, healer, musician Devi Mambouka shares the trippy "Sundown Forest", which takes listeners deep into the subconscious and onto a healing path.

Music

Alright Alright's "Don't Worry" Is an Ode for Unity in Troubling Times (premiere)

Alright Alright's "Don't Worry" is a gentle, prayerful tune that depicts the heart of their upcoming album, Crucible.


Reviews
Collapse Expand Reviews



Features
Collapse Expand Features

PM Picks
Collapse Expand Pm Picks

© 1999-2020 PopMatters.com. All rights reserved.
PopMatters is wholly independent, women-owned and operated.