Music

Wanderlust Festival Day 3

27 July 2009 - Lake Tahoe, CA

On the third day, Wanderlust rocked. The Sunday line-up offered a tasty array of alternative bands that generally seemed pleased to perform in such a beautiful and natural setting. The sun shone more mercifully than it had on the previous day at the mountainous Squaw Value resort near Lake Tahoe, and the gorgeous weather helped lift everyone's spirits.

The Honey Brothers opened the Sunday activities around 12:30 pm with a mix of everything from goofy ukulele and banjo pop tunes to more serious, angular electric guitar-based music. The acting fame of drummer Adrian Grenier (HBO's Entourage) drew many people to attend the day's first show, but the band transcended its novelty act status through the strength of its performance.

The combination of silly songs and powerful rock kept the crowd intrigued, especially when ex-Dresden Doll Amanda Palmer joined the group on a wacked out performance of Queen's "We are the Champions". Palmer loudly reached for notes she couldn't quite hit but wouldn't stop trying to in a pretense of desperation as the band smiled and played.

Palmer's solo set provided the highlight of the festival. She sang many of her best known compositions, including "Coin-Operated Boy" and "House That I Grew Up In", as well as inspired covers. She opened with a simple and lovely version of Bright Eyes' "Lua", and accompanied herself on ukulele while her keyboards went through emergency repair. She later offered a stately version of Michael Jackson's "Billie Jean" that showcased the grand melodrama of the lyrics and piano music.

Palmer engaged the crowd with between song patter as well as introducing her material to those who might not be familiar with her work. She commented on the pleasure of playing in front of a mountain and told stories about what she had been up to lately, which lead to a discussion of Comic-Con and Neil Gaiman. She and Gaiman had recently collaborated on a project, and she sang a somewhat bawdy tune they had written together. She ended her set in Pete Townsend like fashion by smashing her bench across the keyboards.

Maybe the problem was following such an incredible talent, or maybe it was because the band's cellist didn't make the plane, but the Mates of State who followed Palmer seemed to phone in its performance. Many in the crowd dispersed to get beers, go swimming in the nearby pond, or just grab some shade during the band's set. The energy level quickly rose when Broken Social Scene hit the stage. Even before the band officially started playing, singer/guitarist Kevin Drew warned the crowd that, "This is gonna be a punk rock show." The band rocked on all cylinders.

Singer Lisa Lobsinger joined the collective for several tunes, including a hot version of "Fire-Eyed Boy". However, it was Drew that remained the center of attention. He told the crowd to engage in "scream therapy" and said, "It's wonderful therapy, just like yoga" and counted to three to be hit by a loud cry in response. The yoga practitioners in the crowd weren't sure if he was being ironic, but were caught up in the frenzy and joined in. He sincerely told the audience, "Be careful. Be safe. Fight for your right to celebrate and don't let anyone take it away from you," before launching into the closing number.

The strange stylings of Andrew Bird came next as he looped himself playing instruments and whistling, and then sang to the rhythms. Bird was burdened by the fact that much of his equipment did not arrive and he had to borrow stuff from Kaki King, Rogue Wave, and Broken Social Scene. In a way, this helped his performance as he became more improvisational and fed on the positive vibrations from the crowd.

Bird performed splendid acoustic fiddle and vocal versions of Delta bluesman Charley Patton's "Some of These Days" and the old spiritual "Churnin' Burnin'". Bird earnestly told the audience, "This is one of the nicest festivals I have ever played," and it was clear he was sincere.

The Austin band Spoon closed the festival, but rather than mellow out the crowd, the group got everybody re-energized. Spoon played recent favorites, such as "Isla Forever" and "You Got Yr Cherry Bomb" as if the group were performing in a sweaty, Texas club on a Saturday night instead of a beautiful retreat in the mountains on an early Sunday evening.

The quartet also offered a fast and hard version of Paul Simon's "Peace Like a River". The band turned the sad and lonesome tune into a battle cry against the forces that drive one into insomnia and despair. As the show ended, Spoon promised to return again next year if band was invited because the landscape and the audience were so wonderful. As is usually the case when people are having a good time, no one wanted the show to end. The crowd slowly left the venue and descended the mountain with satisfied smiles.

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