Music

Unconditional Love: Soul Music Bites Back

Pontificating on the words behind the meaning behind such words as: "Now that it’s raining more than ever / Know that we’ll still have each other / You can stand under my umbrella, ella-ella-ay-ay-ay".

What happened to unconditional love? Or is it just regulated to Grandma, and her wonderful hands. "Grandma’s Hands" was penned by Bill Withers in a '70s soul beat. And just like Prince singing "Adore", or a million other balladeers crooning in their best falsetto, it’s catchy and captivating when men wear this sort of vulnerability. Yet, societies have even contended to cut off boys’ balls in order to maintain that pre-pubescent, innocent, unthreatening sound -- the emasculated male is somehow so alluring.

Nonetheless, it’s all fantasy: We prefer our men so-called ‘real’. So we give all our stars a damn hard time for the ways in which they effeminate themselves just to maintain our titillation: the make-up, the feather-light hair, the hairless face, the fitted clothes, the glitter, the glam, and, of course, those high voices. We might call them "faggot" in public, then swoon and swing alongside their beats in private. Even as fans, we love conditionally.

Until the end of time

I’ll be there for you.

You are my heart and mind

I truly adore you.

If God one day struck me blind,

Your beauty I’d still see.

Love’s too weak to define

Just what you mean to me. 


“You gotta stand by your brother”, Erykah Badu croons in a soft, lofty voice in the live version of "Other Side of the Game". “Work ain't honest, but it pays the bills”, her talented back-up singers say. “Through whatever, whatever, whatever”, she says, and again members of the crowd slap their palms together while others shout and cheer.

An expectant Jennifer Hudson belts out "Will You Be


There" before a mourning crowd at Michael Jackson's


Memorial in July 2009

“Carry me, like you were my brother / Love me like a mother”, Michael Jackson opens his song "Will You Be There". And since his childhood, fans around the globe have watched this artist dance and sing on stage with his brothers, envisioning the unconditional love of family while singing about how unconditional his love was in songs like “I’ll Be There”.

“Just call my name…”. That’s the most that we could ask of anyone. Sadly, today’s divas and divos would rather just watch us pack, treating each other as if we’re simply replaceable. And despite all that we have, love cannot be bought at Ikea, nor is love found in the aisles of Walmart. In spite of their lifetime warranties, retailers LL Bean and Lands’ End don’t sell unconditional love.

I wanna be

More than your mother,

More than your brother;

I wanna be like no other

If you need me,

I’ll never leave.

I know that you know....

Be with me darlin’ till the end of time


Just like his own androgyny, Prince is notorious for exploring the fine division between the erotic and the platonic, the parental and the lustful. Furthermore, given his backdrop of gender-bending and unadulterated sexuality, Prince’s force is intense and unconditional. Again, it’s this unconditional love that makes His Royal Badness so fascinating to fans spanning a range of musical genres. “I wanna be your lover / I wanna turn you on, turn you out”, he chants over an earlier, funkier beat that he thankfully extends well beyond the dope lyrics and pop radio strip.

Then, of course, there’s Purple Rain. On screen, fans witness that the madness and fervor with which the artist approached love -- the willingness to abandon all reason in tunes like "Darlin’ Nikki" -- clearly stemming from the dysfunction at home.

His lack of fraternal love -- fraternal disapproval and the maternal abandonment in tolerating the abuse -- all lead the character portrayed in the film to supplant the erotic over and above all that he lacked. He was a man who would do anything for love, and it’s this illusion and allusion of success that draws women and men, the premise and promise of unconditional love. Yet, in spite of the fantasy, we’d all rather settle for so much less, like sex, drugs and rock-n-roll.

"Drugs / Rock-n-Roll / Bad-ass Vegas hoes / Shiny disco balls". Ecstasy. Illusion and fantasy. The fantasy of unconditional love is all that it’s about, and any amount of sex, drugs, and rock-n-roll can lead us there. Yet, like any cheap high, it’s unsustainable.

If I was your one and only friend,

Would you run to me if somebody hurt you,

Even if that somebody was me?

Sometimes I trip on how happy we could be

It is a trip. It’s a vacation from life to believe in unconditional love, yet abandon that promise as soon as anything real occurs. “Baby, baby, baby: What’s it gonna be”, Prince begs Apollonia (or wasn’t it Vanity?) on bended knee as she sits and sips with the next man. Just as soon as we promise love, we withdraw these pleas and lament over loss, which we seem to do as easily as we do the falling in love. It’s unrealistic and juvenile to believe in infallibility, for that is what makes us human. So, “let’s just pretend we’re married -- tonight”.

And Michael McDonald bridged:

I know you’re not mine

Anymore

Anyway

Anytime.

Tell me how come I

Keep forgetin’


People lie, cheat, and steal. And all this stems from the abandonment we’ve felt at home, often in spaces were there is lovelessness, even with an abundance of care. Indeed, few heal from those scars, yet pretty much all are involved. Like "Thriller", where each and everyone crawled out of tombs and graves, mortified and decrepit -- we are all perishable. Yet, even in Michael’s fantasies, we don’t all remain that way. "Heal the World", the Jackson family has inevitably advocated in their music, from the Jacksons and "Can You Feel It" to Janet’s "Rhythm Nation" among several other tunes, to most of what Michael Jackson had to say in his music.

Hold me

Like the River Jordan

And I will then say to thee:

You are my friend. 


You are my friend? “I’ve been looking around / And you were here all the time”. So the message seems to be, "through whatever, whatever, whatever", if we genuinely know how to cherish those around us, we’ve probably known unconditional love all the time. “You are my friend / I never knew it till then, my friend / You hold my hand / You might not say a word / But I see your tears when I show my pain”, Patti drones in that other-side-of-the-'80s soul beat. Now, there’s the unconditional love that recognizes friendship through each other’s humanity and occasional fallibility.

But they told me:

‘A Man should be faithful,

And walk when not able,

And fight to the end’

But I’m only human


Love, it seems, is only as conditional as our wiliness to heal. Recognizing that, as REM says, "Everybody Hurts", then will we be there when our lovers, friends, parents, neighbors show out? Will we be there, as Michael suggests, in our darkest hours? Or are we just fair-weather friends? The weatherman can’t predict those conditions with any real accuracy. And Rhianna said: "You can stand under my umbrella, ella-ella-ay-ay-ay / Under my umbrella, ella-ella-ay-ay-ay. (BTW, that’s just the catchy part of the chorus, the song’s actual verses are significantly more instructive).

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