Film

Observe and Report (2009): Blu-ray

Observe and Report will arrive on Blu-ray, DVD, On Demand & Digital Download on 22, September. For more information, feel free to click on the film's official site


Observe and Report

Director: Jody Hill
Cast: Seth Rogen, Anna Faris, Ray Liotta, Michael Peña
Distributor: Warners Home Video
Studio: Warner Brothers
UK Release Date: 2009-09-22
US Release Date: 2009-09-22

It's safe to say that, somewhere down the line, Jody Hill is going to make a truly f*cked-up masterpiece. He's going to drop all the idiosyncrasies and preplanned insularity, dig deep into his feverish and often fetid imagination, dump the angst-ridden Apatow shtick and come away with something truly remarkable. You can sense it in the work he's done so far - the mean-spirited satire of The Foot Fist Way, the equally ugly honesty of Eastbound and Down. Now comes his latest big screen screed, the wickedly weird mall cop craziness known as Observe and Report. Starring funny business flavor of the month Seth Rogen and dealing once again with an isolated individual struggling to make a statement in a world that only wants reassurances, Hill definitely has his hands full. This time around, however, audiences may not be ready for the eerily familiar juggling act.

All his life, Ronnie Barnhardt has wanted to be part of law enforcement. His dream is to become a police officer and carry a gun. Unfortunately, he is stuck as head of security for a local mall, and while he takes his job very seriously, the rest of the employees think he's a joke. When a flasher starts stalking women at the facility, including Ronnie's dream babe make--up counter girl Brandi, the mentally unbalanced rent-a-cop vows to solve the case. In doing so, he hopes this prissy party gal will become his regular Saturday night thing. Of course, he will have to get around actual lawman Detective Harrison, a severe lack of clues, and his own inept sense of self to apprehend the pervert. To add to his frustration, Ronnie finally takes the necessary steps to enter the police academy. While physically capable, his current psychological "deficiencies" might make this a one way street as well.

It's not Hill's fault that Kevin James stole his thunder. Indeed, the stand-up turned pseudo-star could not have anticipated that Paul Blart: Mall Cop would be one of 2009's surprise hits (hackneyed and horrible as it is). Indeed, as audiences exit Observe and Report (or revisit it again on home video), many will probably wonder why Rogen and company choose to ride the coattails of said slapstick slice of family farce - especially with such an antisocial take on the material. The truth, of course, is that both films found their way to market without direct correlation of competition from the other. In addition, Hill was hacking away at this screenplay long before James was jumping up and down like an overstuffed burrito in a ball pit. Still, the similarity in subject matter (and the eventual acceptance of Blart's mindless mediocrity) means that Observe and Report has absolutely no chance at the box office. Perhaps Warner's new DVD and Blu-ray can solve that problem.

Clearly this film is not for everyone. It doesn't reach across commercial boundaries to try and embrace the demographic or be everything to every viewer…and fail. Instead, Hill is like a stubborn old man, sitting on his motion picture front porch and chasing away all but the more adventurous from his aesthetic lawn. Let's face it - anyone who uses a naked fatso running full frontal throughout the finale (in slow motion, nonetheless) is tweaking the tenets of modern audience attention spans. He's challenging those who expect warm and fuzzy with material tepid and frazzled. Rogen is not the cuddly teddy geek he's portrayed in numerous films. Instead, his Ronnie is a bi-polar problem with a penchant for inappropriate comments, obsessive-compulsive fantasizing, and a real love of weaponry. The minute we watch Rogen shooting targets with a massive handgun, we can guess where this contextual characteristic is going to eventually reveal itself.

There are a lot of hidden agendas in Observe and Report, from a fey Hispanic co-worker who might not be completely honest, to a police detective who'd rather screw around with Ronnie than actually solve the case. There is a classic, curse-laden crossfire between Rogen and a kiosk worker that proves that the F-bomb is still the most versatile of all putdown, and we do enjoy the drunken directness of Ronnie's mother. Her combination of inebriated insights and off the wall warmth are almost magical. Indeed, one of the best things about Hill's particular brand of humor is that it's based wholly on people - problem, hate, and pain filled individuals, but human beings nonetheless. He doesn't go for the gross out, unless it's part of someone's personality, nor does he dim the sentimentality to keep the anarchy alive.

This doesn't mean that everything works in Observer and Report. Two important players - Ray Liotta's sarcastic investigating officer and Michael Pena's lisping security guard are significantly underused and ambiguously formulated. When each one reveals their true nature, it's less of a surprise and more like a sudden, senseless shock. The same can be said for Faris' fried make-up clerk. Ditz can only take you so far, and this otherwise capable actress is reduced to playing potted and prone to date-rape like sex. Hill also has a hard time keeping things straight. In one scene, Ronnie is so fascinatingly adept at fighting that he beats down a bevy of street toughs. But in a last act confrontation with the cops, he gets a few good licks in before having his clock cleaned.

What makes this all the more unusual is that Hill genuinely believes in his movies' motives. The new Blu-ray disc has a picture in picture commentary track find the director sitting with his two main leads (Rogen and Farris) and together, they find subtext and psychological complexities that the actual film fails to address. Some of the additional scenes included do flesh out the characters, and all the Making-of material really supports the conclusions being proffered. As for the presentation itself, the 2.41:1 1080p image is excellent, giving a clear consumerism crassness to the New Mexican location. In addition, Hill's ear for aural complements really works within the loseless Dolby Digital TrueHD 5.1 mix. Songs like "It's Late" by Queen and "When I Paint My Masterpiece" by The Band really come alive with speaker sparking goodness.

And even a good digital reproduction might not help. When placed alongside the current crop of gutless comedies, films which manufacture funny stuff out of grade school level quips and uncomfortable physical crudeness (isn't that right, Pink Panther 2?), Observe and Report is like Conan (the Barbarian, not the late night talk show host). It's not afraid to take chances, to push envelopes, and explore elements that usually don't make it into a satire or spoof. With a cast that, for the most part, fits perfectly into Hill's humor ideals and a story that serves the basic needs of the underdog hero formula, a good time should be had by all. But don't underestimate that dreaded Blart effect. Word of mouth will doom the eventual bottom line, but that doesn't take away from what Hill has accomplished. One day, he'll create his classic. Until then, we'll have to put up with above-average efforts like Observe and Report. It's very good. We'll have to wait until Hill achieves 'great'.

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