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Gigantor - The Collection, Volume 2 (1964 - 68)

Gigantor - The Collection, Volume 2 (1964 - 68) - E1 Entertainment [$39.98]


Gigantor

Distributor: E1 Entertainment
Cast: Billie Lou Watt, Cliff Owens, Gilbert Mack, Peter Fernandez
MPAA rating: N/A
Network: Delphi Associates, Inc.
US Release Date: 2009-09-15
Amazon

Even to this day, Gigantor looks like nothing in late '50s/early '60s animation. With their early comic strip influences (Little Nemo was a clear reference point) and the comic book like reliance on panel type reactions shots (lots of electrical sparks, lightning bolts, and energy lines here), these fuzzy, foggy black and white beauties represent the growing pains of anime. The added content present on the DVD also emphasizes the novelty and initial reaction to the show. In conjunction with the original volume, which brought the first 26 shows to viewers, these box sets cement the status of Gigantor as an innovative and true original.

And yet one wonders how the fanboys will react to this obvious blast from the past. Anime has grown by leaps and bounds since the days of Tetsujin 28-go and its forerunners, and by today's standards, this obviously tinkered with title looks positively primitive. It can't hold a future shock illustration to something like Appleseed. And yet that's also part of Gigantor's charms. Like the roots of rock and roll, or the foundations of film itself, the beginnings of the Japanese cartoon format are fascinating in their stylized shortcut mentality. Unlike Disney who sweated every detail, the Asian aesthetic was one of punch and power. Getting to the meat of a situation was far more important than languishing over a beautifully painted backdrop. Gigantor gets massive kudos for clearing the way to this new and important genre. That it also stands on its own, beyond said novelty, is a very nice surprise indeed.


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