Film

Part Two: October 2010

By the look of the calendar -- and this list of titles - it looks like Hollywood is out to investigate the horrors of vampires, demon children, alien invasion, and the most evil entity of all -- Facebook!

By the look of the calendar -- and this list of titles - it looks like Hollywood is out to investigate the horrors of vampires, demon children, alien invasion, and the most evil entity of all -- Facebook!

By all accounts, 2010 has been a pretty mediocre year for movies... so far. In the eight months that have transpired, we've seen the lingering effects of Avatar's billion dollar success (translation: more 3D titles than ever before), a surprise vote of confidence for intellectually challenging, cinematically spectacular popcorn fare (read: Inception), and more than a few miscues (Kick-Ass) and misfires (Scott Pilgrim vs. The World). In between, the same filmic flotsam and jetsam ebbed and flowed. The RomCom and CG family genre both underperformed, while action spectacles aimed at the easy to please PG-13 demo keeled over and died. In fact, if the last two-thirds of the calendar have taught us anything, it's that Hollywood no longer cares about pleasing the masses. While it would be nice, a few micro-managed, focus grouped hits will do just as well. [READ FULL INTRODUCTION]

 
Director: David Fincher

Film: The Social Network

Cast: Jesse Eisenberg, Andrew Garfield, Justin Timberlake, Brenda Song, Rashida Jones, Max Minghella, Rooney Mara, Joseph Mazzello

MPAA rating: R

Image: http://images.popmatters.com/blog_art/t/thesocialnetworkposter.jpg

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1 October
The Social Network

Ever since it was announced, the Aaron Sorkin/David Fincher collaboration on the founding of Facebook has stirred up its own cottage industry of gossip and controversy. Based on the book The Accidental Billionaires by Ben Mezrich, it focuses on the group of Harvard pals who came up with -- and fought over -- the idea of the intensely popular website and its eventually moneymaking mechanism. Recently, main Facebook force Mark Zuckerberg came out and claimed the film was 100% fiction, and you won't find a fan page for the movie anywhere on the group. Either it hits far too close to home, or is more dramatics than direct fact. Either way, we can't wait.

 
Director: Matt Reeves

Film: Let Me In

Cast: Kodi Smit-McPhee, Chloë Moretz, Richard Jenkins, Elias Koteas, Cara Buono, Sasha Barrese, Dylan Minnette

MPAA rating: R

Image: http://images.popmatters.com/blog_art/l/letmeinposter.jpg

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1 October
Let Me In

This is destined to be one of 2010's most over-considered offerings. Of course, when you decide to remake the critically popular revisionist Swedish vampire masterwork Let the Right One In, you are bound to stir some pointed prose. Helmed by Matt Reeves who turned Cloverfield into a found footage phenomenon and starring up and comers Kodi Smit-McPhee and Chloë Moretz in the leads, it promises to provide more insight into the child vampire/adult dynamic as well as dealing with other subplots left out of the 2008 adaptation. Many in the foreign fright film fanbase just hope that Reeves does right by this material. It's a large charge indeed.

 
Director: Christian Alvart

Film: Case 39

Cast: Renée Zellweger, Jodelle Ferland, Ian McShane, Bradley Cooper, Cynthia Stevenson, Alexander Conti

MPAA rating: R

Image: http://images.popmatters.com/blog_art/c/case39poster.jpg

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1 October
Case 39

Nothing shouts "STINKER" louder than a movie made several years ago that has sat on the shelf waiting for a release. This Renée Zellweger thriller, centering on a social worker dealing with a potentially possessed young girl, might smack of the recent Last Exorcism but with Pandorum's Christian Alvart behind the lens, it promises to be a lot more potent. Still, there's a lot of speculation as to why this film has been MIA for so long, and the obvious answer is quality. Here's hoping there's more here than a quick Fall Season money grab. Unfortunately, history dictates otherwise.




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