Film

More Body Horror: On Takashi Miike

Takashi Miike's Yatterman

If you know Takashi Miike at all, then you’re probably a good enough horror fan already. If you don’t know him then, as long as you like horror, body horror in particular, you’re missing out. Miike is like a Japanese Eli Roth, though he’s older, more varied and prolific, and often less sardonic. Eli Roth is a monument in current American Horror, triumphant mainly because of his “gore porn” contribution to the 2000s’ “Splat Pack” era, supplementing Saw’s economic revival of horror with Hostel, an instantly memorable assault on America’s fascination with sexual conquest in Europe.

Miike, like Roth, understands horror and where we are, in the Third World, on a dark and filmic level. He’s responsible for years of films worth your time and attention, often considers the same limits as Roth and other American body horror filmmakers, leading us through the lives of an experimentally distorted family in Visitor Q (2001); a flamboyant serial killer in Ichi the Killer (2001); and amid the Yakuza in a David Lynch-ian for 2003’s Gozu.

Miike is perhaps most well know for 1999’s Audition, but don’t skip is unaired episode of Showtime’s Masters of Horror series, “Imprint".

'Psycho': The Mother of All Horrors

Psycho stands out not only for being one of Alfred Hitchcock's greatest films, it is also one of his most influential. It has been a template and source material for an almost endless succession of later horror films, making it appropriate to identify it as the mother of all horror films.

Francesc Quilis
Film

The City Beneath: A Century of Los Angeles Graffiti (By the Book)

With discussions of characters like Leon Ray Livingston (a.k.a. "A-No. 1"), credited with consolidating the entire system of hobo communication in the 1910s, and Kathy Zuckerman, better known as the surf icon "Gidget", Susan A. Phillips' lavishly illustrated The City Beneath: A Century of Los Angeles Graffiti, excerpted here from Yale University Press, tells stories of small moments that collectively build into broad statements about power, memory, landscape, and history itself.

Susan A. Phillips
Books

The 10 Best Indie Pop Albums of 2009

Indie pop in 2009 was about all young energy and autumnal melancholy, about the rush you feel when you first hear an exciting new band, and the bittersweet feeling you get when your favorite band calls it quits.

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