Please donate to help save PopMatters. We are moving to WordPress in January out of necessity and need your help.
Events

CIFF 2010: 'Norman' (Jonathan Segal, 2010)

Charismatic up-and-coming actor Dan Byrd (Easy A, Cougar Town) brings a bit of grace and humor to the titular character in Norman, a tale of a depressed teenager who feigns stomach cancer while privately battling other demons.


Norman

Director: Jonathan Segal
Cast: Dan Byrd, Richard Jenkins, Emily VanCamp, Adam Goldberg
Year: 2010
US Release Date: 2010-10-08 (CIFF)
UK Release Date: TBD
Website

It's not easy making what should be a depressing film enjoyable. Which isn't saying that Norman is the next feel-good-hit-of-the-season. But considering its subject -- an unpopular teenager whose family is falling apart tells his peers he's dying of cancer -- Norman is an engrossing tale.

Norman is, through and through, an actors' picture. Director Jonathan Segal let his cast breathe, and they carried the film through a few potentially lethal cliché narrative forces. There's the not too popular kid at the forefront of the story (Dan Byrd); the suburban plight narrative; the guy-gets-the-girl rom-com.

Talton Wingate's screenplay may veer a little too close to such well-worn territory. Fortunately, the cast pulls it all together to help make every inch of film a visceral, emotional viewing.

A large part of Norman's emotional center comes from Richard Jenkins, who plays Norman's father, Doug Long: Jenkins brings an immeasurable amount of emotional gravitas to the movie, deftly performing a difficult role as a stubborn doctor refusing treatment for his debilitating stomach cancer.

As Norman's sole guardian -- Norman's mother died in a car accident -- Doug is both Norman's emotional rock and a major cause of inner turmoil for the young man. Jenkins absolutely nails the role, and his performance packs a devastating emotional wallop every moment he's onscreen: Jenkins deserves every award that can be thrown his way.

In the title role, Dan Byrd is slightly less versatile. The up-and-coming actor plays a slightly darker version of a role he's played fairly often: the unpopular, kind of geeky teenager. Here's hoping his work in Norman will help Byrd break out of that role: known best for his comedic work (Easy A, Cougar Town), Norman sees Byrd juggling weighty issues most teenagers never have to think about. Sure, he does it with a dark sense of humor, but Norman's decisions are not quite as sharp as his tongue.

When Norman's peers catch wind of a lie he told his best friend -- that he has terminal stomach cancer and will die in three months -- Norman gives into the lie rather than confess the harsher reality of his father's impending death. Norman isn't the first film in recent years to grapple with how a dramatic lie can affect a community. Nor is it the best in recent memory -- that goes to Bobcat Goldthwait's sorely under-appreciated 2009 movie, World's Greatest Dad. But Norman discusses confronting mortality in a way that's far more affecting than most films this year.

7

Please Donate to Help Save PopMatters

PopMatters have been informed by our current technology provider that we have to move off their service. We are moving to WordPress and a new host, but we really need your help to fund the move and further development.


Music

Film


Books


Television




© 1999-2020 PopMatters Media, Inc. All rights reserved. PopMatters is wholly independent, women-owned and operated.






Features
Collapse Expand Features



Reviews
Collapse Expand Reviews

PM Picks
Collapse Expand Pm Picks

© 1999-2020 PopMatters.com. All rights reserved.
PopMatters is wholly independent, women-owned and operated.