Remembering Linda McCartney’s Best Songs

Linda McCartney was the great muse of rock ‘n’ roll. Jack Lawrence wrote the 1947 hit “Linda” after her when she was just an infant. Practically every love song Paul McCartney wrote from 1967 to 1998 (and probably even more afterwards) was about her. She was often right there beside him, adding instrumentation, vocalizing, and co-writing along with him, but she’s hardly mentioned for her own talents. As we mark the 12th anniversary of her untimely death, let’s take a look at some of the best of her music.

“Silly Love Songs” just wouldn’t be the same without Linda’s mid-song refrain.


Paul intended “Man We Was Lonely” as a nod to Johnny and June Carter Cash’s duets, and achieved the desired effect with his newfound songwriting partner and bandmate, Linda.


Remember, “Another Day” was credited to Paul and Linda McCartney. Not only did she co-write the hit, but she also added a necessary feminine touch with her background vocals, giving a voice to the song’s protagonist: a lonely working girl.


She puts in more than background vocals in “Some People Never Know”, a full on duet between the happily married couple.


“I Am Your Singer” is another duet, but it has a livelier pace to it.


Credited under the name of “Suzy & the Red Stripes”, “Seaside Woman” was partially written to disprove critics (and music publishers) who believed she was “incapable of songwriting".


A music video for the psychedelic “Oriental Nightfish” was included in the animated video collection Rupert and the Frog Song, but beware: some children find it extremely disturbing!


A devoted vegetarian, her solo song “Cow” shows the strength of her convictions.


While the standard version of “Hey Diddle” is listed below, the Wingspan compilation features a cute outtake of “Bip Bop/Hey Diddle” that features the McCartney family singing together.


Released on the Wings at the Speed of Sound album, “Cook of the House” is all Linda, singing a simple song about her own life. I, for one, will remember her best through this song.

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