Music

The 25 Best Progressive Rock Songs of All Time

Put as simply -- and starkly -- as possible, many beautiful babies were thrown out with the bath water by hidebound critics who were content to sniffingly dismiss the more ambitious (pretentious!) works that certain bands were putting out as a matter of course in the early-to-mid-‘70s.

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20. King Crimson, "Red"

The progenitors of math rock on their last album of the '70s. Red is the paradigm that every pointy-headed prog rock band worships at the altar of (even if they don't realize it, because the bands they do worship once worshipped here). The title track is a yin yang of intellect and adrenaline, underscored with a very scientific, discernibly English sensibility. Robert Fripp, who has never been boring or unoriginal, outdoes himself while John Wetton and Bill Bruford do some of their finest work as well. It's the closest thing rock guitar ever got to its own version of "Giant Steps".

 

19. Pink Floyd, "Echoes"

Most everyone would agree that Dark Side of the Moon made Pink Floyd the first (and last) band in space, but not as many people might appreciate that, if it were not for 1971's Meddle, there would have been no Dark Side of the Moon. Gilmour's guitar and vocal contributions delineate the ways in which he was asserting himself as the major musical force within the group (a very positive development), forging an increasingly melodic and ethereal sound. The point that cannot be overemphasized is that "Echoes" is not so much an inspired product of its time as much as it is the realization of a sound and style the band had been inching toward with each successive effort. "Echoes" unfolds deliberately, with carefully structured precision. The merging of Gilmour and Wright's voices —- a harbinger of good things to come, although on "Time" Wright sings the choruses while Gilmour handles the verses -- is appropriately mesmerizing, and the two remain uncannily in synch on their respective instruments. "Echoes" also signals a minor step forward for Waters lyrically (the major step would be the aforementioned, and unavoidable, Dark Side of the Moon.

 

18. Rush, "Natural Science"

If 2112 is the album Rush had to make, Permanent Waves is the work that paved the way for a new decade and the next (most successful) phase of their career. The centerpiece of the album is the sixth and final song, "Natural Science": it does not grab you by the ear the way 2112 does and it does not have the immediate, irresistible appeal of "Tom Sawyer", but it's, quite possibly, the band's most perfect achievement. Neil Peart's lyrics, which tackle ecology, commercialism and artistic integrity (without being pretentious or self-righteous) are, in hindsight, not merely an end-of-decade statement of purpose but a presciently fin-de-siecle assessment that still, amazingly, functions as both indictment and appeal. "Natural Science" endures as the last document before Moving Pictures triangulated math rock, prog rock and the fertile new soil of synth-based popular music and did the inconceivable, making Rush a household name.

 

17. Yes, "Heart of the Sunrise"

As much as any other band, Yes epitomizes prog-rock, and as such, they are entitled to the praise as well as the disapproval that accrues from this (at times, dubious) honor. Certainly this band, with the possible exception of Rush, gets the least love from the so-called critical establishment. Nevermind that (like Rush) its musicians, pound for pound and instrument for instrument, are as capable and talented as any that have very played. Steve Howe is, like Robert Fripp, a thinking man's guitar hero. His solos are like algebra equations, but full of emotion; his mastery of the instrument colors almost every second of every song from the fruitful era that produced their "holy trinity", The Yes Album, Fragile and Close to the Edge. "Heart of the Sunrise", aside from boasting some of Wakeman, Bruford and Squire's most spirited support, features one of Jon Anderson's signature vocal workouts. The band made longer, more intricate and segue-laden songs, but none of them pack as much emotion and intensity: there is so much going on here, all of it compelling and ingenious, that it manages to delight —- and even surprise -- four decades on.

 

16. Jethro Tull, "Heavy Horses"

Meanwhile back in the year... 1978? It's an embarrassing commentary on how close-minded so many folks are that they probably have never even heard this song. Of course, the professionals who write most often about rock music in the '70s are not known for their fondness of multisyllabic words and material that obliges a modest understanding of world history. Back to basics? How about back to the 18th century? That is the vibe Jethro Tull was emanating circa 1978. The band that dropped not one, but two single-song album suites had evolved into a proficient troupe of professionals that incorporated strings, lutes, fifes and harpsichords into their repertoire. To put it more plainly, the same years the Clash, the Ramones and the Sex Pistols were establishing a radically new and brazen rock aesthetic, Ian Anderson appeared on an album cover flanked by two Clydesdales. The title track is a typically literate -- and unironic! -- tribute to the working horses of England that, much like prog-rock, were soon to step aside, their demise having less to do with trends and tastemakers than technology.

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