Events

World Press Photo 11 & The World's Stateless: August 2011 - United Nations

Award-winning and politically charged photographs on display at the United Nations are well worth examining.

World Press Photo 11

City: United Nations Building, Manhattan

Currently on exhibit in the United Nations Headquarters' General Assembly Public Lobby are two image galleries, The World's Stateless, an exhibition presented by The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees and the traveling set of winning images from the 54th World Press Photo Contest, entitled World Press Photo 11. Open to everyone, the United Nations building, located on the east side of Manhattan, is considered international territory (it has its own post office). From the press release, "the traveling exhibition of the world’s best press photographs of 2010, selected at the 2011 World Press Photo’s contest for professional photographers, will be on display in the Main Gallery of the Visitors Lobby at United Nations Headquarters in New York from 5 – 28 August."

Please be advised: some of the images below contain content not suitable for minors. Images here are photos of the photography currently on display at the United Nations. All images below are copyright by their respective photographers.

The World's Stateless (images not presented in order):

 

World Press Photo 11 (images not presented in order):

World Press Photo of the Year by "South African photographer Jodi Bieber as World Press Photo of the Year 2010. The picture shows Bibi Aisha, 18, who was disfigured as retribution for fleeing her husband's house in Oruzgan province, in the center of Afghanistan. At the age of 12, Aisha and her younger sister had been given to the family of a Taliban fighter under a Pashtun tribal custom for settling disputes. When she reached puberty she was married to him, but she later returned to her parents' home, complaining of violent treatment by her in-laws."

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